Next Article in Journal
Survey on Modelling and Techniques for Friction Estimation in Automotive Brakes
Previous Article in Journal
A Neural Networks Approach for Improving the Accuracy of Multi-Criteria Recommender Systems
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessCommunication
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(9), 871; doi:10.3390/app7090871

Effect of Enzymatic Beech Fagus Sylvatica Wood Hydrolysate on Chlorella Biomass, Fatty Acid and Pigment Production

1
TERRA, AgricultureIsLife, University of Liege-Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Passage des Déportés 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium
2
Genetics and Physiology of Microalgae, Institute of Botany, University of Liege, B22, Chemin de la vallée, B-4000 Liège, Belgium
3
Unit of Biological and Industrial Chemistry, University of Liege-Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Passage des Déportés 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 July 2017 / Revised: 13 August 2017 / Accepted: 18 August 2017 / Published: 25 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Chemistry)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [581 KB, uploaded 28 August 2017]   |  

Abstract

This work evaluates the possibility of applying enzymatic beech wood (Fagus sylvatica) hydrolysate as a feedstock for Chlorella sorokiniana growth, and fatty acid and pigment production. Beech wood solids were pretreated with NaOH at high temperature to partially remove xylose and Klason lignin, and enable production of glucose during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Neutralized wood enzymatic hydrolysate containing glucose (TGP-Enz10), was tested on Chlorella growth during heterotrophic cultivation and compared with microalgae growth in a medium containing synthetic glucose (TGP). Results show that enzymatic hydrolysate enabled Chlorella growth in the dark for biomass, fatty acid and pigment production due to the presence of glucose, although the productivity obtained was smaller, if compared to heterotrophic cultivation in a synthetic TGP medium. Partial growth inhibition and diminished productivity in wood hydrolysate supplemented Chlorella culture was due to the presence of neutralized citrate buffer. Neutralized citrate buffer (TGP-Cit10) was found to partially inhibit heterotrophic growth and also strongly suppress mixotrophic growth in Chlorella culture. This buffer was also shown to alter fatty acid composition and to slightly affect ChlTotal/CarTotal ratio during heterotrophic cultivation. Heterotrophic Chlorella cultivation with TGP-Enz10 showed that wood enzymatic hydrolysate can constitute a potential feedstock for microalgae cultivation, although the composition of the buffer used during enzymatic hydrolysis should be taken into consideration. View Full-Text
Keywords: wood hydrolysate; microalgae cultivation; bioreactor; fatty acids; pigments wood hydrolysate; microalgae cultivation; bioreactor; fatty acids; pigments
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Miazek, K.; Remacle, C.; Richel, A.; Goffin, D. Effect of Enzymatic Beech Fagus Sylvatica Wood Hydrolysate on Chlorella Biomass, Fatty Acid and Pigment Production. Appl. Sci. 2017, 7, 871.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Appl. Sci. EISSN 2076-3417 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top