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Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(12), 1307; doi:10.3390/app7121307

Effect of Aggregate Mineralogy and Concrete Microstructure on Thermal Expansion and Strength Properties of Concrete

1
Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA
2
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Georgia, 208 Driftmier Engineering Center (Annex), Athens, GA 30602, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 November 2017 / Revised: 4 December 2017 / Accepted: 13 December 2017 / Published: 18 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Materials)
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Abstract

Aggregate type and mineralogy are critical factors that influence the engineering properties of concrete. Temperature variations result in internal volume changes could potentially cause a network of micro-cracks leading to a reduction in the concrete’s compressive strength. The study specifically studied the effect of the type and mineralogy of fine and coarse aggregates in the normal strength concrete properties. As performance measures, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and compressive strength were tested with concrete specimens containing different types of fine aggregates (manufactured and natural sands) and coarse aggregates (dolomite and granite). Petrographic examinations were then performed to determine the mineralogical characteristics of the aggregate and to examine the aggregate and concrete microstructure. The test results indicate the concrete CTE increases with the silicon (Si) volume content in the aggregate. For the concrete specimens with higher CTE, the micro-crack density in the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) tended to be higher. The width of ITZ in one of the concrete specimens with a high CTE displayed the widest core ITZ (approx. 11 µm) while the concrete specimens with a low CTE showed the narrowest core ITZ (approx. 3.5 µm). This was attributed to early-age thermal cracking. Specimens with higher CTE are more susceptible to thermal stress. View Full-Text
Keywords: coefficient of thermal expansion; compressive strength; aggregate mineralogy; interfacial transition zone; microstructure; line scanning technique coefficient of thermal expansion; compressive strength; aggregate mineralogy; interfacial transition zone; microstructure; line scanning technique
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An, J.; Kim, S.S.; Nam, B.H.; Durham, S.A. Effect of Aggregate Mineralogy and Concrete Microstructure on Thermal Expansion and Strength Properties of Concrete. Appl. Sci. 2017, 7, 1307.

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