Next Article in Journal
Air Quality Impacts of Petroleum Refining and Petrochemical Industries
Next Article in Special Issue
Relationship between Ambient Temperature and Mental Health in the USA
Previous Article in Journal
Calcium Sulfoaluminate, Geopolymeric, and Cementitious Mortars for Structural Applications
Previous Article in Special Issue
Climate Change and Food In/Security: A Critical Nexus
Article Menu
Issue 3 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Environments 2017, 4(3), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments4030065

So Close Yet So Far Apart: Contrasting Climate Change Perceptions in Two “Neighboring” Coastal Communities on Aotearoa New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula

School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 September 2017 / Published: 18 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Risk and Climate Change)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2370 KB, uploaded 19 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

Coastal hazard risk, compounded by climate change, is escalating. Efforts to address this challenge are fraught and ‘success’ is elusive. We focus on this impasse and recommend ways to improve understanding, reduce risk and enable adaptation. Two Aotearoa New Zealand coastal communities, Mercury Bay and Kennedy Bay, on the Coromandel Peninsula, serve as case studies. Ethnographic fieldwork underpins this analysis. Despite close proximity, local perceptions are ‘worlds apart’. Poor understanding of climate change, and preoccupation with everyday issues, is commonplace. Moreover, there are countervailing community narratives. In Kennedy Bay, which is undeveloped and Māori, climate change is not a manifest concern. Local narratives are rooted in Māori culture and under the shadow of colonization, which shapes contemporary perceptions, practices and prospects. In Mercury Bay, a rapidly developing resort town, seashore property owners demand protection works—ignoring sea-level rise and privileging short-term private interests. Despite laudable regulatory provisions, static responses to dynamic risks prevail and proactive adaptation is absent. Recommendations are made to improve understanding about local cultural-social-ecological characteristics, climate change and adaption. Enabling leadership and capability-building are needed to institutionalize proactive adaptation. Strengthening Māori self-determination (rangatiratanga) and guardianship (kaitiakitanga), and local democracy, are key to mobilizing and sustaining community-based adaptation governance. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aotearoa New Zealand; Coromandel; Kennedy Bay; Mercury Bay; Whitianga; vulnerability; climate change; coastal hazard risk; adaptation governance Aotearoa New Zealand; Coromandel; Kennedy Bay; Mercury Bay; Whitianga; vulnerability; climate change; coastal hazard risk; adaptation governance
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Schneider, P.; Glavovic, B.; Farrelly, T. So Close Yet So Far Apart: Contrasting Climate Change Perceptions in Two “Neighboring” Coastal Communities on Aotearoa New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula. Environments 2017, 4, 65.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Environments EISSN 2076-3298 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top