Next Article in Journal
Neuroticism Predicts Subsequent Risk of Major Depression for Whites but Not Blacks
Next Article in Special Issue
Atypical Processing of Novel Distracters in a Visual Oddball Task in Autism Spectrum Disorder
Previous Article in Journal
A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Behav. Sci. 2017, 7(3), 63; doi:10.3390/bs7030063

Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Short-Term Outcome Study

1
Non Invasive Brain Stimulation Unit, International Center for Neurological Restoration, 25th Ave, Playa, Havana 15805, Cuba
2
Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, Borrás-Marfán Hospital, G and 27 Street., Vedado, Havana 10400, Cuba
3
Neuropediatric Clinic, International Center for Neurological Restoration, 25th Ave. Playa, Havana 15805, Cuba
4
Clinical Neurophysiology Lab., International Center for Neurological Restoration, 25th Ave. Playa, Havana 15805, Cuba
5
Clinical Immunology Lab., International Center for Neurological Restoration, 25th Ave. Playa, Havana 15805, Cuba
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 July 2017 / Revised: 8 September 2017 / Accepted: 14 September 2017 / Published: 17 September 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1390 KB, uploaded 17 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) is a relatively new therapeutic approach that has shown beneficial effects in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). One question to be answered is how enduring its neuromodulatory effect could be. Twenty-four patients with ASD (mean age: 12.2 years) received 20 sessions of NIBS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC). They were randomized into two groups with two (G1) or three (G2) clinical evaluations before NIBS. Both groups had a complete follow-up at six months after the intervention, with the aim of determining the short-term outcome using the total score on the Autism Behavior Checklist, Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist, and the Autism Diagnostic Interview. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) was used in ASD patients aged <11 years, and repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) for 11–13-year-olds. Observation points were at one, three, and six months after completing all the sessions of NIBS. A significant reduction in the total score on the three clinical scales was observed and maintained during the first six months after treatment, with a slight and non-significant tendency to increase the scores in the last evaluation. Twenty sessions of NIBS over the L-DLPFC improves autistic symptoms in ASD children, with a lasting effect of six months. View Full-Text
Keywords: autism; transcranial direct current stimulation; repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation autism; transcranial direct current stimulation; repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Gómez, L.; Vidal, B.; Maragoto, C.; Morales, L.M.; Berrillo, S.; Vera Cuesta, H.; Baez, M.; Denis, M.; Marín, T.; Cabrera, Y.; Sánchez, A.; Alarcón, C.; Selguera, M.; Llanez, Y.; Dieguez, L.; Robinson, M. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Short-Term Outcome Study. Behav. Sci. 2017, 7, 63.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Behav. Sci. EISSN 2076-328X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top