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Behav. Sci. 2014, 4(4), 437-447; doi:10.3390/bs4040437

Merging Evidence-Based Psychosocial Interventions in Schizophrenia

1
Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, C-358, 90 Vincent d'Indy Street, C.P. 6128, Succ Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada
2
Centre for Action in Work Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, 150 Place Charles Le Moyne, Bureau 200, Longueuil, QC J4K 0A8, Canada
3
Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, 3351 Boul Des Forges, Trois-Rivières, QC G9A 5H7, Canada
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 June 2014 / Revised: 14 October 2014 / Accepted: 15 October 2014 / Published: 6 November 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Treatment of the Major Mental Disorders)
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Abstract

Psychosocial interventions are an essential part of the treatment for people with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The criteria regarding what makes an intervention “evidence-based” along with a current list of evidence-based interventions are presented. Although many evidence-based interventions exist, implementation studies reveal that few, if any, are ever implemented in a given setting. Various theories and approaches have been developed to better understand and overcome implementation obstacles. Among these, merging two evidence-based interventions, or offering an evidence-based intervention within an evidence-based service, are increasingly being reported and studied in the literature. Five such merges are presented, along with their empirical support: cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with skills training; CBT and family psychoeducation; supported employment (SE) and skills training; SE and cognitive remediation; and SE and CBT. View Full-Text
Keywords: evidence-based intervention; schizophrenia; CBT; skills training; family psychoeduaction; supported employment; cognitive remediation evidence-based intervention; schizophrenia; CBT; skills training; family psychoeduaction; supported employment; cognitive remediation
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Lecomte, T.; Corbière, M.; Simard, S.; Leclerc, C. Merging Evidence-Based Psychosocial Interventions in Schizophrenia. Behav. Sci. 2014, 4, 437-447.

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