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Geosciences 2015, 5(2), 95-116; doi:10.3390/geosciences5020095

Fluvial Transport Model from Spatial Distribution Analysis of Libyan Desert Glass Mass on the Great Sand Sea (Southwest Egypt): Clues to Primary Glass Distribution

1
Área Académica de Ciencias de la Tierra y Materiales, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo (UAEH), Ciudad del Conocimiento, Col. Carboneras, Mineral de la Reforma, Hidalgo 42184, Mexico
2
Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Luis Enrique Erro No. 1, Sta. María Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jesus Martinez-Frias
Received: 27 June 2014 / Revised: 8 March 2015 / Accepted: 12 March 2015 / Published: 2 April 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Planetary Geosciences and Space Exploration)
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Abstract

Libyan Desert Glass (LDG) is a natural silica-rich melted rock found as pieces scattered over the sand and bedrock of the Western Desert of Egypt, northeast of the Gilf Kebir. In this work, a population mixture analysis serves to relate the present spatial distribution of LDG mass density with the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene fluvial dynamics in the Western Desert of Egypt. This was verified from a spatial distribution model that was predicted from the log-normal kriging method using the LDG–mass-dependent transformed variable, Y(x). Both low- and high-density normal populations (–9.2 < Y(x) < –3.5 and –3.8 < Y(x) < 2.1, respectively) were identified. The low-density population was the result of an ordinary fluvial LDG transport/deposition sequence that was active from the time of the melting process, and which lasted until the end of activity of the Gilf River. The surface distribution of the high-density population allowed us to restrict the source area of the melting process. We demonstrate the importance of this geostatistical study in unveiling the probable location of the point where the melting of surficial material occurred and the role of the Gilf River in the configuration of the observed strewn field. View Full-Text
Keywords: kriging interpolation; Libyan Desert Glass; LDG strewn field; paleodrainage system kriging interpolation; Libyan Desert Glass; LDG strewn field; paleodrainage system
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Jimenez-Martinez, N.; Ramirez, M.; Diaz-Hernandez, R.; Rodriguez-Gomez, G. Fluvial Transport Model from Spatial Distribution Analysis of Libyan Desert Glass Mass on the Great Sand Sea (Southwest Egypt): Clues to Primary Glass Distribution. Geosciences 2015, 5, 95-116.

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