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Erratum published on 4 August 2017, see Animals 2017, 7(8), 58.

Open AccessOpinion
Animals 2017, 7(7), 52; doi:10.3390/ani7070052

A Cultural Conscience for Conservation

Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford OX13 5QL, UK
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Received: 5 June 2017 / Revised: 6 July 2017 / Accepted: 13 July 2017 / Published: 20 July 2017
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Abstract

On 2 July 2015, the killing of a lion nicknamed “Cecil” prompted the largest global reaction in the history of wildlife conservation. In response to this, it is propitious to consider the ways in which this moment can be developed into a financial movement to transform the conservation of species such as the lion that hold cultural significance and sentiment but whose numbers in the wild are dwindling dangerously. This provocative piece explores how a species royalty could be used effectively by drawing revenue from the heavy symbolic use of charismatic animals in affluent economies. This would, in turn, reduce strain on limited government funds in threatened animals’ native homelands. Three potential areas of lucrative animal symbolism—fashion, sports mascots, and national animals—provide examples of the kind of revenue that could be created from a species royalty. These examples also demonstrate how this royalty could prove to be a desirable means by which both corporations and consumers could positively develop their desired selves while simultaneously contributing to a relevant and urgent cause. These examples intend to ignite a multi-disciplinary conversation on the global cultural economy’s use of endangered species symbols. An overhaul in perspective and practice is needed because time is running out for much of the wildlife and their ecosystems that embellish products and embody anthropocentric business identities. View Full-Text
Keywords: culture; species royalty; funding; sports mascots; fashion animals; national animals; heritage culture; species royalty; funding; sports mascots; fashion animals; national animals; heritage
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Good, C.; Burnham, D.; Macdonald, D.W. A Cultural Conscience for Conservation. Animals 2017, 7, 52.

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