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Animals 2017, 7(11), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani7110086

The Effect of Hock Injury Laterality and Lameness on Lying Behaviors and Lying Laterality in Holstein Dairy Cows

Department of Animal Science, University of Tennessee, 2506 River Dr. 258 Brehm Animal Science Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
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Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 13 November 2017 / Published: 17 November 2017
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Abstract

Lactating dairy cattle divide their lying equally between their left side and their right side. However, discomfort, such as pregnancy and cannulation, can cause a cow to shift lying side preference. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of lameness and hock injuries on lying behaviors, particularly lying laterality, of lactating dairy cows. Cows from four commercial farms in eastern Croatia that had lying behavior data, health score data, and production records were used in the study. Health scores including hock injuries and locomotion were collected once per cow. Severely lame cows had greater daily lying time compared to sound cows and moderately lame cows. Overall, cows spent 51.3 ± 1.2% of their daily lying time on the left side. Maximum hock score, locomotion score, hock injury laterality, or parity did not result in lying laterality differing from 50%. View Full-Text
Keywords: laterality; lying behavior; cow; hock injury; lameness laterality; lying behavior; cow; hock injury; lameness
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Eberhart, N.L.; Krawczel, P.D. The Effect of Hock Injury Laterality and Lameness on Lying Behaviors and Lying Laterality in Holstein Dairy Cows. Animals 2017, 7, 86.

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