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Animals 2015, 5(2), 259-269; doi:10.3390/ani5020259

The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 6001, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marina von Keyserlingk
Received: 25 February 2015 / Revised: 16 April 2015 / Accepted: 17 April 2015 / Published: 24 April 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Welfare of Shelter Animals)
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Simple Summary

First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary units. The program has three primary components: spay/neuter, shelter medical days and Animals in Focus. Student gain significant hands-on experience and evaluations of the program by students are overwhelmingly positive.

Abstract

The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education. View Full-Text
Keywords: Surgical instruction; animal shelter; shelter medicine; spay/neuter; shelter education; shelter management; veterinary education Surgical instruction; animal shelter; shelter medicine; spay/neuter; shelter education; shelter management; veterinary education
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bushby, P.; Woodruff, K.; Shivley, J. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program. Animals 2015, 5, 259-269.

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