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Animals 2014, 4(3), 494-514; doi:10.3390/ani4030494

Pain Management for Animals Used in Science: Views of Scientists and Veterinarians in Canada

Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC), 190 O'Connor St., Suite 800, Ottawa, ON, K2P 2R3, Canada
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Received: 21 March 2014 / Revised: 22 July 2014 / Accepted: 28 July 2014 / Published: 4 August 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ethical and Social Dimensions of Animal Experimentation)
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Simple Summary

Veterinarians, veterinarian-scientists and scientists (all engaged in animal-based studies in Canada) were interviewed to explore the challenges and opportunities for laboratory animal pain management. Our broader aim was to contribute to further discussion of how pain can be minimized for animals used in science. Recognizing when animals are in pain continues to present a challenge, and there does not seem to be consensus on the signs of pain. Clarification of the interactions between scientific objectives and pain management are needed, as well as a stronger evidence base for pain management approaches. Detailed examination of pain management for individual invasive animal models in order to develop model-specific pain management protocols may be useful.

Abstract

To explore the challenges and opportunities for pain management for animals used in research an interview study with 9 veterinarians, 3 veterinarian-scientists and 9 scientists, all engaged in animal-based studies in Canada, was carried out. Our broader aim was to contribute to further discussion of how pain can be minimized for animals used in science. Diverse views were identified regarding the ease of recognizing when animals are in pain and whether animals hide pain. Evidence of inconsistencies in pain management across laboratories, institutions and species were also identified. Clarification of the interactions between scientific objectives and pain management are needed, as well as a stronger evidence base for pain management approaches. Detailed examination of pain management for individual invasive animal models may be useful, and may support the development of model-specific pain management protocols. View Full-Text
Keywords: analgesia; animal models; interview study; pain management; refinement analgesia; animal models; interview study; pain management; refinement
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Fenwick, N.; Duffus, S.E.G.; Griffin, G. Pain Management for Animals Used in Science: Views of Scientists and Veterinarians in Canada. Animals 2014, 4, 494-514.

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