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Animals 2013, 3(4), 1086-1122; doi:10.3390/ani3041086
Communication

Policing Farm Animal Welfare in Federated Nations: The Problem of Dual Federalism in Canada and the USA

Received: 30 October 2013; in revised form: 21 November 2013 / Accepted: 26 November 2013 / Published: 2 December 2013
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Simple Summary: In any federation of states, societal oversight of farm animal welfare (agriculture policy arena, prevention) is more difficult to achieve than providing punishment of individuals abusing of companion animals (post injury). The constitutional division of powers and historical policy related to animal agriculture and non-government organization policing cruelty of companion animals may be entrenched. With changing societal expectations of agriculture production, each level of government may hesitate to take the lead, due to financial or ideological beliefs and simultaneously, obstruct the other government level from taking the lead, based on constitutional grounds. The tradition of private policing of companion animal abuse offences may be unworkable in the provision of protection for animals used in industrial production.
Abstract: In recent European animal welfare statutes, human actions injurious to animals are new “offences” articulated as an injury to societal norms in addition to property damage. A crime is foremost a violation of a community moral standard. Violating a societal norm puts society out of balance and justice is served when that balance is returned. Criminal law normally requires the presence of mens rea, or evil intent, a particular state of mind; however, dereliction of duties towards animals (or children) is usually described as being of varying levels of negligence but, rarely can be so egregious that it constitutes criminal societal injury. In instrumental justice, the “public goods” delivered by criminal law are commonly classified as retribution, incapacitation and general deterrence. Prevention is a small, if present, outcome of criminal justice. Quazi-criminal law intends to establish certain expected (moral) standards of human behavior where by statute, the obligations of one party to another are clearly articulated as strict liability. Although largely moral in nature, this class of laws focuses on achieving compliance, thereby resulting in prevention. For example, protecting the environment from degradation is a benefit to society; punishing non-compliance, as is the application of criminal law, will not prevent the injury. This paper will provide evidence that the integrated meat complex of Canada and the USA is not in a good position to make changes to implement a credible farm animal protection system.
Keywords: animal law; Criminal law; law enforcement; policing; Christian inquisition; SPCA; method of production; animal cruelty; division of powers; fundamentalism; zealot animal law; Criminal law; law enforcement; policing; Christian inquisition; SPCA; method of production; animal cruelty; division of powers; fundamentalism; zealot
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MDPI and ACS Style

Whiting, T.L. Policing Farm Animal Welfare in Federated Nations: The Problem of Dual Federalism in Canada and the USA. Animals 2013, 3, 1086-1122.

AMA Style

Whiting TL. Policing Farm Animal Welfare in Federated Nations: The Problem of Dual Federalism in Canada and the USA. Animals. 2013; 3(4):1086-1122.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Whiting, Terry L. 2013. "Policing Farm Animal Welfare in Federated Nations: The Problem of Dual Federalism in Canada and the USA." Animals 3, no. 4: 1086-1122.

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