Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Conceptualising Animal Abuse with an Antisocial Behaviour Framework
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
What’s in a Name?—Consequences of Naming Non-Human Animals
Animals 2011, 1(1), 126-143; doi:10.3390/ani1010126
Article

Integrating Values and Ethics into Wildlife Policy and Management—Lessons from North America

1,2,*  and 3
Received: 18 January 2011; Accepted: 18 January 2011 / Published: 25 January 2011
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [87 KB, updated 2 February 2011; original version uploaded 25 January 2011]
Abstract: Few animals provoke as wide a range of emotions as wolves. Some see wolves as icons of a lost wilderness; others see them as intruders. As the battle continues between wolf proponents and opponents, finding solutions that resolve conflicts while supporting the integrity of nature is challenging. In this essay we argue that we need to make room for wolves and other native carnivores who are re-colonizing areas from which they were extirpated. Strategies that foster coexistence are necessary and wildlife agencies must consider all stakeholders and invest adequate resources to inform the public about how to mitigate conflicts between people/domestic animals, and predators. Values and ethics must be woven into wildlife policy and management and we must be willing to ask difficult ethical questions and learn from past mistakes.
Keywords: wolves; reintroduction; ethics; values; wildlife management; predator management; coexistence, attitudes; human-wildlife interaction; carnivores wolves; reintroduction; ethics; values; wildlife management; predator management; coexistence, attitudes; human-wildlife interaction; carnivores
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Export to BibTeX |
EndNote


MDPI and ACS Style

Fox, C.H.; Bekoff, M. Integrating Values and Ethics into Wildlife Policy and Management—Lessons from North America. Animals 2011, 1, 126-143.

AMA Style

Fox CH, Bekoff M. Integrating Values and Ethics into Wildlife Policy and Management—Lessons from North America. Animals. 2011; 1(1):126-143.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fox, Camilla H.; Bekoff, Marc. 2011. "Integrating Values and Ethics into Wildlife Policy and Management—Lessons from North America." Animals 1, no. 1: 126-143.


Animals EISSN 2076-2615 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert