Next Article in Journal
U.S. Volunteering in the Aftermath of the Great Recession: Were African Americans a Significant Factor?
Next Article in Special Issue
The Impact of Sanctions and Neo-Liberalism on Women’s Organising in Iran
Previous Article in Journal
Oil in Syria between Terrorism and Dictatorship
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Fragility of Gender Equality Policies in Spain
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Soc. Sci. 2016, 5(2), 21; doi:10.3390/socsci5020021

Veiled Politics: Muslim Women’s Visibility and Their Use in European Countries’ Political Life

School of Languages and Cultures for International Communication and Cooperation, University of Milan, Piazza I. Montanelli 1, Sesto S. Giovanni, 20100 Milan, Italy
Academic Editor: Nancy A. Naples
Received: 11 January 2016 / Revised: 18 April 2016 / Accepted: 11 May 2016 / Published: 18 May 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women, Gender and Politics: An International Overview)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [220 KB, uploaded 18 May 2016]

Abstract

One of the many disastrous consequences of the tragic events of 9/11 is the war waged by the neocolonialists in order to “liberate” Muslim women. This gender-based war stands on a series of pillars, such as the presumption that Western civilization offers women a great deal of privileges, while Muslim culture gives none. Therefore, it would be logical to suppose that, because of the many opportunities the West grants to Muslim women who reside there, the latter may have an active role in the local political process. However, Muslim women have scarce visibility in European political life, and their presence is sometimes merely instrumental to some party: in most cases, women are coopted because they are a good sample of “secular Muslims” (i.e., they do not wear the hijab, i.e., the veil and a modest attire); in others, they are appointed because they are veiled and can therefore become a good vehicle in order to win the support both of the Muslim community and of its sympathizers. In this paper, I will analyze some crucial aspects of Muslim women’s formal political participation in some European countries; in addition, I will focus on the Italian case with the help of a series of interviews with Muslim women who play an active role in local political councils. The study shows how in European politics, Muslim women can become a commodity even when they stand out as rising political individuals; but also how they fight to gain visibility and public recognition, in spite of the tense situation and of the rampant Islamophobia. View Full-Text
Keywords: Muslim women and European politics; Muslim women’s political activity in Europe; Islamophobia; Muslim women in Europe; the veil issue Muslim women and European politics; Muslim women’s political activity in Europe; Islamophobia; Muslim women in Europe; the veil issue
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Vanzan, A. Veiled Politics: Muslim Women’s Visibility and Their Use in European Countries’ Political Life. Soc. Sci. 2016, 5, 21.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top