Next Article in Journal
Review of Renewable Energy Technologies in Zambian Households: Capacities and Barriers Affecting Successful Deployment
Previous Article in Journal
Improving Natural Ventilation Conditions on Semi-Outdoor and Indoor Levels in Warm–Humid Climates
Previous Article in Special Issue
Preventing Dampness Related Health Risks at the Design Stage of Buildings in Mediterranean Climates: A Cyprus Case Study
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Buildings 2018, 8(6), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8060076

The Effects of Low Air Temperatures on Thermoregulation and Sleep of Young Men While Sleeping Using Bedding

1
Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580, Japan
2
Human Informatics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 6, 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566, Japan
3
Kansei Fukushi Research Center, Tohoku Fukushi University, 1-149-6 Kunimigaoka, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 989-3201, Japan
4
Department of Education, Tohoku Fukushi University, 1-149-6 Kunimigaoka, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 989-3201, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 April 2018 / Revised: 25 May 2018 / Accepted: 26 May 2018 / Published: 29 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupant Comfort and Well-Being)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1517 KB, uploaded 30 May 2018]   |  

Abstract

Most people do not use heating systems during nocturnal sleep in their bedrooms during the cold season in Japan; instead, they like to use extra blankets and quilts for sleeping. To investigate the effect of low air temperature (Ta) on sleep and thermoregulation when sleeping with bedding, 12 healthy young men participated in sleep experiments over three non-consecutive nights. The experimental conditions were at a Ta of 3 °C, 10 °C and 17 °C, with a relative humidity (Rh) of 50% and an air velocity of <0.2 m/s in the climatic chambers. The 4.3-clo bedding consisted of cotton sheets, an acrylic blanket, a down-filled quilt and a futon mattress. The average sleep efficiency index (SEI) remained >94% for each of the three Tas, and no disturbances were found by Ta in the sleep parameters, although the duration of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep showed variations at 3 °C. The skin temperature (Ts) of the forehead decreased in proportion to Ta and remained stable. The decreasing rate in rectal temperature (Tre), Ts of forehead and thigh during sleep were significantly greater at 3 °C than at 10 °C and 17 °C. The innermost microclimate temperature (Tmicro) made by the bedding did not correlate with the Tre. The young men were significantly more dissatisfied with 3 °C in the sleep quality evaluation. View Full-Text
Keywords: sleep; low air temperature; bedding; microclimate; thermal comfort sleep; low air temperature; bedding; microclimate; thermal comfort
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Tsuzuki, K.; Okamoto-Mizuno, K.; Mizuno, K. The Effects of Low Air Temperatures on Thermoregulation and Sleep of Young Men While Sleeping Using Bedding. Buildings 2018, 8, 76.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Buildings EISSN 2075-5309 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top