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Buildings 2017, 7(4), 105; doi:10.3390/buildings7040105

EU Support for Innovation and Market Uptake in Smart Buildings under the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme

European Commission, Executive Agency for Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises, Place Charles Rogier 16, B-1210 Brussels, Belgium
Received: 22 September 2017 / Revised: 17 October 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 10 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from Sustainable Places 2017 (SP2017) Conference)
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Abstract

At the end of November 2016, the European Commission tabled the Clean Energy for All Europeans package, which represents a large set of proposals for several key directives related to energy. The package included proposed revisions to the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) which seek to update and streamline the Directive in several areas, including provisions to ensure buildings operate efficiently by encouraging the uptake of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and smart technologies. Although it can be argued that there is at present no commonly accepted definition of a “smart building”, the Commission’s proposed revision refers to three key features of a possible indicator of “smartness” in buildings: the technological readiness of a building to (1) interact with its occupants; (2) to interact with the grid; and (3) to manage itself efficiently. Using these three pillars of “smartness” as a methodological starting point, this paper identifies and analyses recent and ongoing Horizon 2020 research, innovation and market uptake projects which are investigating “smart buildings”. The research maps and examines the tasks, scope and innovations in areas that include building automation and control systems, demand response, energy management, ICT and user interfaces for energy efficiency. View Full-Text
Keywords: smart buildings; energy efficiency; EPBD; Horizon 2020; demand response; building energy management; BEMS smart buildings; energy efficiency; EPBD; Horizon 2020; demand response; building energy management; BEMS
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Moseley, P. EU Support for Innovation and Market Uptake in Smart Buildings under the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme. Buildings 2017, 7, 105.

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