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Laws, Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2012), Pages 1-68

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Laws Editorial
Laws 2012, 1(1), 1-3; doi:10.3390/laws1010001
Received: 20 May 2011 / Accepted: 23 May 2011 / Published: 31 May 2011
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Abstract
My life’s work has positioned me in two diverse worlds’ one in science and one in law [1]. I publish in both fields, and the traditions are very different. Law journals typically have narrow readerships, principally those in the legal academy. The law
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My life’s work has positioned me in two diverse worlds’ one in science and one in law [1]. I publish in both fields, and the traditions are very different. Law journals typically have narrow readerships, principally those in the legal academy. The law review tradition, particularly in North America, is student edited, non-peer reviewed, and characteristically long and detailed. Law libraries often spend large portions of their budgets on journal subscriptions, which they store in scarce space. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle One Health, One World—The Intersecting Legal Regimes of Trade, Climate Change, Food Security, Humanitarian Crises, and Migration
Laws 2012, 1(1), 4-38; doi:10.3390/laws1010004
Received: 27 February 2012 / Revised: 14 March 2012 / Accepted: 19 March 2012 / Published: 4 April 2012
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Abstract
Today’s global health challenges require a multi-sectoral approach in which health is a fundamental value within global governance and international law. “One Health, One World” provides a unified, harmonious vision of global health governance that supports the wellbeing of humans and animals living
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Today’s global health challenges require a multi-sectoral approach in which health is a fundamental value within global governance and international law. “One Health, One World” provides a unified, harmonious vision of global health governance that supports the wellbeing of humans and animals living in a clean and temperate environment. This article focuses on five legal regimes—trade law, food security law, environmental law, humanitarian law, and refugee law—that play a pivotal role in influencing health outcomes and are integral to achieving the One Health, One World vision. International trade, for example, opens markets not only to life-saving products such as vaccines, medicines, and medical equipment, but also to life-threatening products such as tobacco and asbestos. If strengthened and enforced, environmental law can decrease air and water pollution, major causes of death and disability. World hunger has been exacerbated by the global economic crisis and climate change, increasing the urgency for international law to enhance food security. Humanitarian law must similarly be strengthened to protect civilians adequately as the nature of warfare continues to change. Refugee law plays a pivotal role in protecting the health of deeply vulnerable people who lack food, shelter, and social stability. Higher standards and more effective compliance are necessary for international law to realize its full potential to safeguard the world's population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Trends in Legal Scholarship: Emerging Doctrines and Theories)
Open AccessArticle Achieving Ecological Objectives
Laws 2012, 1(1), 39-63; doi:10.3390/laws1010039
Received: 3 April 2012 / Revised: 15 May 2012 / Accepted: 14 June 2012 / Published: 2 July 2012
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Abstract
The legal objective for surface water in the EU is ‘good ecological status’, as established by the Water Framework Directive, with a timeframe of 15, 21 or 27 years. To reach this objective, suitable legal instruments are needed, and quality standards are among
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The legal objective for surface water in the EU is ‘good ecological status’, as established by the Water Framework Directive, with a timeframe of 15, 21 or 27 years. To reach this objective, suitable legal instruments are needed, and quality standards are among the instruments intended to improve the ecological status. However, both the Directive and quality standards are founded on reductionism, risking an over-application of over-simplified concepts, probably reducing biological diversity. A realistic and more appropriate timeframe for river basin rehabilitation would be around 100 years, emphasizing several concerns, such as the importance of encompassing the entire life history of species, the shift in human perceptions, the systemic unity of humans and ecosystems, environmental irreducibility, site-specific reference points, and the divergence of the assessment of water quality and the general ecological status of a river basin. From a legal standpoint, a century emphasizes a temporal agreement and a normative commitment to the generations to come. Ecologically, a century time-scale gives enough time for the processes of evolution, dispersal and recolonization and succession to re-establish stable, more diverse biological communities in physically rehabilitated habitats and river basins, whereas the present timetable for achievement of the ecological objectives does not. Full article
Open AccessCommunication The State of Contracts Scholarship in the United States
Laws 2012, 1(1), 64-68; doi:10.3390/laws1010064
Received: 4 September 2012 / Revised: 6 October 2012 / Accepted: 11 October 2012 / Published: 18 October 2012
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Abstract This paper reports on the state of contracts scholarship in the United States, utilizing two methods of approximating where scholarship has focused since 2007 and where it is headed in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Trends in Legal Scholarship: Emerging Doctrines and Theories)

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