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Societies 2016, 6(3), 25; doi:10.3390/soc6030025

Latinos Need to Stay in Their Place: Differential Segregation in a Multi-Ethnic Suburb

1
Institute of American Cultures, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7244, USA
2
Department of Sociology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7244, USA
Academic Editor: Gregor Wolbring
Received: 1 April 2016 / Revised: 3 August 2016 / Accepted: 8 August 2016 / Published: 15 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cross-racial and Cross-ethnic Personal and Group Relationships)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [235 KB, uploaded 15 August 2016]

Abstract

While Latinos face high levels of segregation, there is scant research specifically addressing whites’ attitudes towards Latinos regarding their preferences. This study draws from 40 in-depth interviews with whites in Orange County California, an area with a large Latino and Asian population. I demonstrate that white respondents choose to segregate themselves from Latinos. Most studies have used Blumer’s group position theory to explain white attitudes and neighborhood preference towards Blacks. My findings supports Blumer’s group position theory by revealing why white respondents feel threatened by an increase in the Latino population. Yet, the Asian population has also grown, but white respondents convey positive sentiments towards Asians, and express they feel comfortable living and interacting with them. I argue that white respondents’ preferences with regards to integration are not solely based on the size of a group, but rather whether they characterize the group as inferior. Integration has been touted as an American principle. Yet, as the country becomes more diverse, this case study illustrates that white respondents prefer to share space with those they feel similar to, and consequently contribute to Latino segregation. View Full-Text
Keywords: Latinos; segregation; race and ethnicity; group position theory Latinos; segregation; race and ethnicity; group position theory
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Lacayo, C. Latinos Need to Stay in Their Place: Differential Segregation in a Multi-Ethnic Suburb. Societies 2016, 6, 25.

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