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Lubricants 2017, 5(2), 9; doi:10.3390/lubricants5020009

Friction Reduction Tested for a Downsized Diesel Engine with Low-Viscosity Lubricants Including a Novel Polyalkylene Glycol

1
Tribology and Efficiency, Virtual Vehicle Research Center, Inffeldgasse 21A, 8010 Graz, Austria
2
Powertrain Mechanical Design, Renault Lardy Technical Center, 1 Allée Cornuel, 91510 Lardy, France
3
Diesel Advanced Engineering Technologies, Renault Technocenter, 1 Avenue du Golf, F78084 Guyancourt Cedex, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Michel Fillon
Received: 14 March 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 7 April 2017
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Abstract

With the increasing pressure to reduce emissions, friction reduction is always an up-to-date topic in the automotive industry. Among the various possibilities to reduce mechanical friction, the usage of a low-viscosity lubricant in the engine is one of the most effective and most economic options. Therefore, lubricants of continuously lower viscosity are being developed and offered on the market that promise to reduce engine friction while avoiding deleterious mixed lubrication and wear. In this work, a 1.6 L downsized Diesel engine is used on a highly accurate engine friction test-rig to determine the potential for friction reduction using low viscosity lubricants under realistic operating conditions including high engine loads. In particular, two hydrocarbon-based lubricants, 0W30 and 0W20, are investigated as well as a novel experimental lubricant, which is based on a polyalkylene glycol base stock. Total engine friction is measured for all three lubricants, which show a general 5% advantage for the 0W20 in comparison to the 0W30 lubricant. The polyalkylene glycol-based lubricant, however, shows strongly reduced friction losses, which are about 25% smaller than for the 0W20 lubricant. As the 0W20 and the polyalkylene glycol-based lubricant have the same HTHS-viscosity , the findings contradict the common understanding that the HTHS-viscosity is the dominant driver related to the friction losses. View Full-Text
Keywords: engine friction; efficiency; engine oil; synthetic lubricant; polyglycol; measurement; bearing temperature; HTHS-viscosity engine friction; efficiency; engine oil; synthetic lubricant; polyglycol; measurement; bearing temperature; HTHS-viscosity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Sander, D.E.; Knauder, C.; Allmaier, H.; Damjanović-Le Baleur, S.; Mallet, P. Friction Reduction Tested for a Downsized Diesel Engine with Low-Viscosity Lubricants Including a Novel Polyalkylene Glycol. Lubricants 2017, 5, 9.

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