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Minerals 2018, 8(3), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8030084

Indications that Amorphous Calcium Carbonates Occur in Pathological Mineralisation—A Urinary Stone from a Guinea Pig

1
Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstraße 10, D-78464 Konstanz, Germany
2
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
3
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Arrhenius Laboratories of Natural Sciences, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 January 2018 / Revised: 22 February 2018 / Accepted: 24 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
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Abstract

Calcium carbonate is an abundant biomineral that is of great importance in industrial or geological contexts. In recent years, many studies of the precipitation of CaCO3 have shown that amorphous precursors and intermediates are widespread in the biomineralization processes and can also be exploited in bio-inspired materials chemistry. In this work, the thorough investigation of a urinary stone of a guinea pig suggests that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) can play a role in pathological mineralization. Importantly, certain analytical techniques that are often applied in the corresponding analyses are sensitive only to crystalline CaCO3 and can misleadingly exclude the relevance of calcium carbonate during the formation of urinary stones. Our analyses suggest that ACC is the major constituent of the particular stone studied, which possibly precipitated on struvite nuclei. Minor amounts of urea, other stable inorganics, and minor organic inclusions are observed as well. View Full-Text
Keywords: amorphous calcium carbonate; urinary stones; guinea pig; pathological mineralization; struvite amorphous calcium carbonate; urinary stones; guinea pig; pathological mineralization; struvite
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Gebauer, D.; Jansson, K.; Oliveberg, M.; Hedin, N. Indications that Amorphous Calcium Carbonates Occur in Pathological Mineralisation—A Urinary Stone from a Guinea Pig. Minerals 2018, 8, 84.

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