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Land 2015, 4(2), 513-540; doi:10.3390/land4020513

Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production (HANPP) in an Agriculturally-Dominated Watershed, Southeastern USA

1
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway, Greenville, SC 29613, USA
2
Department of Biology, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway, Greenville, SC 29613, USA
Current address: Synterra Corp., 148 River Street, Suite 220, Greenville, SC 29601, USA.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Audrey L. Mayer
Received: 4 January 2015 / Revised: 9 June 2015 / Accepted: 11 June 2015 / Published: 18 June 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecosystem Function and Land Use Change)
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Abstract

Human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP) quantifies alteration of the biosphere caused by land use change and biomass harvest. In global and regional scale assessments, the majority of HANPP is associated with agricultural biomass harvest. We adapted these methods to the watershed scale and calculated land cover change and HANPP in an agricultural watershed in 1968 and 2011. Between 1968 and 2011, forest cover remained near 50% of the watershed, but row crop decreased from 26% to 0.4%, pasture increased from 19% to 32%, and residential area increased from 2% to 10%. Total HANPP decreased from 35% of potential Net Primary Productivity (NPP) in 1968 to 28% in 2011. Aboveground HANPP remained constant at 42%. Land use change accounted for 86%–89% of HANPP. Aboveground HANPP did not change despite the major shift in agricultural land use from row crop and pasture. The HANPP and land use change in Doddies Creek watershed reflects changing land use patterns in the southeastern US, driven by a complex interaction of local to global scale processes including change in farm viability, industrialization of agriculture, and demographic shifts. In the future, urbanization and biofuel production are likely to become important drivers of HANPP in the region. At the watershed scale, HANPP can be useful for improving land use decisions and landscape management to decrease human impact on the ecosystem and ensure the flow of ecosystem services. View Full-Text
Keywords: anthrome; biodiversity; forest; HANPP; land cover change; pasture; Piedmont; urbanization; watershed management anthrome; biodiversity; forest; HANPP; land cover change; pasture; Piedmont; urbanization; watershed management
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Andersen, C.B.; Donovan, R.K.; Quinn, J.E. Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production (HANPP) in an Agriculturally-Dominated Watershed, Southeastern USA. Land 2015, 4, 513-540.

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