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Atmosphere 2018, 9(4), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9040133

Seasonal Variability of Airborne Particulate Matter and Bacterial Concentrations in Colorado Homes

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
2
Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
3
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 February 2018 / Revised: 25 March 2018 / Accepted: 27 March 2018 / Published: 2 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Pollution)
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Abstract

Aerosol measurements were collected at fifteen homes over the course of one year in Colorado (USA) to understand the temporal variability of indoor air particulate matter and bacterial concentrations and their relationship with home characteristics, inhabitant activities, and outdoor air particulate matter (PM). Indoor and outdoor PM2.5 concentrations averaged (±st. dev.) 8.1 ± 8.1 μg/m3 and 6.8 ± 4.5 μg/m3, respectively. Indoor PM2.5 was statistically significantly higher during summer compared to spring and winter; outdoor PM2.5 was significantly higher for summer compared to spring and fall. The PM2.5 I/O ratio was 1.6 ± 2.4 averaged across all homes and seasons and was not statistically significantly different across the seasons. Average indoor PM10 was 15.4 ± 18.3 μg/m3 and was significantly higher during summer compared to all other seasons. Total suspended particulate bacterial biomass, as determined by qPCR, revealed very little seasonal differences across and within the homes. The qPCR I/O ratio was statistically different across seasons, with the highest I/O ratio in the spring and lowest in the summer. Using one-minute indoor PM10 data and activity logs, it was observed that elevated particulate concentrations commonly occurred when inhabitants were cooking and during periods with elevated outdoor concentrations. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbiome; PM2.5; PM10; indoor air quality; qPCR microbiome; PM2.5; PM10; indoor air quality; qPCR
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Clements, N.; Keady, P.; Emerson, J.B.; Fierer, N.; Miller, S.L. Seasonal Variability of Airborne Particulate Matter and Bacterial Concentrations in Colorado Homes. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 133.

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