Next Article in Journal
Effects of Agricultural Biomass Burning on Regional Haze in China: A Review
Previous Article in Journal
Enteric Methane Emissions Estimate for Livestock in South Africa for 1990–2014
Previous Article in Special Issue
Quantifying Light Absorption of Iron Oxides and Carbonaceous Aerosol in Seasonal Snow across Northern China
Article Menu
Issue 5 (May) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Atmosphere 2017, 8(5), 86; doi:10.3390/atmos8050086

Quantifying Dry and Wet Deposition Fluxes in Two Regions of Contrasting African Influence: The NE Iberian Peninsula and the Canary Islands

1
Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA, CSIC), C/Jordi Girona 18–26, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
2
Izaña Atmospheric Research Centre (AEMET), C/La Marina 20, 38001 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
3
Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: George Kallos and Marina Astitha
Received: 28 February 2017 / Revised: 25 April 2017 / Accepted: 15 May 2017 / Published: 18 May 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2077 KB, uploaded 18 May 2017]   |  

Abstract

This study considers the role of distance to the African source on the amount of deposition. To this end, dry and wet deposition was measured at a site close to Africa (Santa Cruz de Tenerife in the Canary Islands, SCO) and at a distant site located in NE Spain (La Castanya, Montseny, MSY). Because of the important influence of African influence on the buildup of particles in the atmosphere, we specifically addressed the contribution of North African events (NAF events) compared to other provenances (no-NAF events) in the wet and dry pathways at the two sites. At the site close to Africa, most of the crustal-derived elements were deposited in the dry mode, with NAF events contributing more than no-NAF events. Marine elements, by contrast, were mostly deposited at this site in the wet form with a predominance of no-NAF events. At MSY, wet deposition of SO4–S, NO3–N and NH4–N during NAF events was higher than at the site close to Africa, either in the wet or dry mode. This fact suggests that mineral dust interacts with pollutants, the mineral surface being coated with ammonium, sulphate and nitrate ions as the dust plume encounters polluted air masses in its way from North Africa to the Western Mediterranean. African dust may provide a mechanism of pollution scavenging and our results indicate that this removal is more effective in the wet mode at sites far away from the mineral source. View Full-Text
Keywords: mineral dust; dry deposition; wet deposition; African intrusions; particulate matter; anthropogenic pollution mineral dust; dry deposition; wet deposition; African intrusions; particulate matter; anthropogenic pollution
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Castillo, S.; Alastuey, A.; Cuevas, E.; Querol, X.; Avila, A. Quantifying Dry and Wet Deposition Fluxes in Two Regions of Contrasting African Influence: The NE Iberian Peninsula and the Canary Islands. Atmosphere 2017, 8, 86.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Atmosphere EISSN 2073-4433 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top