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Agronomy 2018, 8(7), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8070114

Good Riddance? Breaking Disease Susceptibility in the Era of New Breeding Technologies

Chair of Phytopathology, TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan, Technical University of Munich, 85354 Freising, Germany
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Received: 11 June 2018 / Revised: 29 June 2018 / Accepted: 2 July 2018 / Published: 5 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses in Crop Plants)
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Abstract

Despite a high abundance and diversity of natural plant pathogens, plant disease susceptibility is rare. In agriculture however, disease epidemics often occur when virulent pathogens successfully overcome immunity of a single genotype grown in monoculture. Disease epidemics are partially controlled by chemical and genetic plant protection, but pathogen populations show a high potential to adapt to new cultivars or chemical control agents. Therefore, new strategies in breeding and biotechnology are required to obtain durable disease resistance. Generating and exploiting a genetic loss of susceptibility is one of the recent strategies. Better understanding of host susceptibility genes (S) and new breeding technologies now enable the targeted mutation of S genes for genetic plant protection. Here we summarize biological functions of susceptibility factors and both conventional and DNA nuclease-based technologies for the exploitation of S genes. We further discuss the potential trade-offs and whether the genetic loss of susceptibility can provide durable disease resistance. View Full-Text
Keywords: plant immunity; effector-triggered susceptibility; necrotrophic effector; biotroph; susceptibility gene; host reprogramming; pathogen nutrition; plant cell development; natural diversity; CRISPR plant immunity; effector-triggered susceptibility; necrotrophic effector; biotroph; susceptibility gene; host reprogramming; pathogen nutrition; plant cell development; natural diversity; CRISPR
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Engelhardt, S.; Stam, R.; Hückelhoven, R. Good Riddance? Breaking Disease Susceptibility in the Era of New Breeding Technologies. Agronomy 2018, 8, 114.

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