Next Article in Journal
Raising Crop Productivity in Africa through Intensification
Previous Article in Journal
Using FACE Systems to Screen Wheat Cultivars for Yield Increases at Elevated CO2
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Agronomy 2017, 7(1), 21; doi:10.3390/agronomy7010021

Effect of Sowing Method and N Application on Seed Yield and N Use Efficiency of Winter Oilseed Rape

Agronomy and Crop Science, Institute of Crop Science and Plant Breeding, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Hermann-Rodewald-Str. 9, D-24118 Kiel, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Bertrand Hirel
Received: 2 November 2016 / Revised: 15 February 2017 / Accepted: 22 February 2017 / Published: 28 February 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1103 KB, uploaded 28 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

In northern Europe, replacing winter barley with winter wheat as the preceding crop for winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.; WOSR) often results in a delayed WOSR sowing and poor autumn growth. Based on data from a field experiment running in 2009/2010, 2010/2011, and 2012/2013, this study aims (i) to investigate how a delayed sowing method affects seed yield, N offtake with the seeds, and apparent N use efficiency (NUE) of WOSR; (ii) to test the ability of autumn and spring N fertilization to compensate for the negative effects of a delayed sowing method; and (iii) to estimate the minimum autumnal growth for optimal seed yield. In order to create sufficiently differentiated canopies, a combination of four sowing methods (first week of August until the third week of September) and four autumn N treatments (0, 30, 60, and 90 kg·N·ha−1) was established. Each of these 16 different canopies was fertilized with 5 N amounts (0/0, 40/40, 80/80, 120/120, 140/140 kg·N·ha−1) in spring in order to estimate separate N response curves. Above-ground N accumulation in autumn and seed yield and N offtake by the seeds were determined. Plant establishment after mid-September significantly decreased seed yield. Autumn N fertilization of at least 30 kg·N·ha−1 increased seed yield and N offtake by the seeds without any significant interaction with sowing method and spring N supply. However, the pathway(s) remain(s) unclear. Spring N fertilization up to 130 kg·N·ha−1 (estimated by a Linear-Plateau N response curve) increased seed yield. NUE decreased with increasing N supply, where WOSR used autumn N to a lesser extent than spring N. An above-ground N uptake of at least 10–15 kg·N·ha−1 at the end of autumn growth was required to achieve high seed yields. From an environmental point of view, optimal autumn growth should be attained by choosing an adequate sowing method, not by applying additional N in autumn. View Full-Text
Keywords: oilseed rape; seed yield; sowing method; N fertilization; autumn N uptake; N use efficiency oilseed rape; seed yield; sowing method; N fertilization; autumn N uptake; N use efficiency
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sieling, K.; Böttcher, U.; Kage, H. Effect of Sowing Method and N Application on Seed Yield and N Use Efficiency of Winter Oilseed Rape. Agronomy 2017, 7, 21.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Agronomy EISSN 2073-4395 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top