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Catalysts 2017, 7(8), 240; doi:10.3390/catal7080240

Enzymatic Oxyfunctionalization Driven by Photosynthetic Water-Splitting in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

1
Junior Research Group for Microbial Biotechnology, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany
2
Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 14, 8010 Graz, Austria
3
Chair of Plant Biochemistry, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 July 2017 / Revised: 10 August 2017 / Accepted: 10 August 2017 / Published: 17 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Oxidation Catalysis)
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Abstract

Photosynthetic water-splitting is a powerful force to drive selective redox reactions. The need of highly expensive redox partners such as NADPH and their regeneration is one of the main bottlenecks for the application of biocatalysis at an industrial scale. Recently, the possibility of using the photosystem of cyanobacteria to supply high amounts of reduced nicotinamide to a recombinant enoate reductase opened a new strategy for overcoming this hurdle. This paper presents the expansion of the photosynthetic regeneration system to a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase. Despite the potential of this strategy, this work also presents some of the encountered challenges as well as possible solutions, which will require further investigation. The successful enzymatic oxygenation shows that cyanobacterial whole-cell biocatalysis is an applicable approach that allows fuelling selective oxyfunctionalisation reactions at the expense of light and water. Yet, several hurdles such as side-reactions and the cell-density limitation, probably due to self-shading of the cells, will have to be overcome on the way to synthetic applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: photosynthesis; catalytic water-splitting; Baeyer–Villiger oxidation; cyanobacteria; recombinant enzyme expression photosynthesis; catalytic water-splitting; Baeyer–Villiger oxidation; cyanobacteria; recombinant enzyme expression
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Böhmer, S.; Köninger, K.; Gómez-Baraibar, Á.; Bojarra, S.; Mügge, C.; Schmidt, S.; Nowaczyk, M.M.; Kourist, R. Enzymatic Oxyfunctionalization Driven by Photosynthetic Water-Splitting in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Catalysts 2017, 7, 240.

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