Next Article in Journal
Peri-Operative Management of Older Adults with Cancer—The Roles of the Surgeon and Geriatrician
Next Article in Special Issue
Therapy for BRAFi-Resistant Melanomas: Is WNT5A the Answer?
Previous Article in Journal
Hedgehog Signaling in the Maintenance of Cancer Stem Cells
Previous Article in Special Issue
Treatment of Regional Metastatic Melanoma of Unknown Primary Origin
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Cancers 2015, 7(3), 1586-1604; doi:10.3390/cancers7030852

Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage in White, Hispanic and Black Skin Melanocytes: A Risk for Cutaneous Melanoma

1
Hampton University Skin of Color Research Institute, Hampton, VA 23668, USA
2
Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA 23507, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Chyi-Chia Richard Lee
Received: 6 June 2015 / Revised: 15 July 2015 / Accepted: 10 August 2015 / Published: 14 August 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Topics in Cutaneous Melanoma)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2334 KB, uploaded 18 August 2015]   |  

Abstract

Cutaneous Melanoma (CM) is a leading cause of cancer deaths, with reports indicating a rising trend in the incidence rate of melanoma among Hispanics in certain U.S. states. The level of melanin pigmentation in the skin is suggested to render photoprotection from the DNA-damaging effects of Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR). UVR-induced DNA damage leads to cytogenetic defects visualized as the formation of micronuclei, multinuclei and polymorphic nuclei in cells, and a hallmark of cancer risk. The causative relationship between Sun exposure and CM is controversial, especially in Hispanics and needs further evaluation. This study was initiated with melanocytes from White, Hispanic and Black neonatal foreskins which were exposed to UVR to assess their susceptibility to UVR-induced modulation of cellular growth, cytogenetic damage, intracellular and released melanin. Our results show that White and Hispanic skin melanocytes with similar levels of constitutive melanin are susceptible to UVR-induced cytogenetic damage, whereas Black skin melanocytes are not. Our data suggest that the risk of developing UVR-induced CM in a skin type is correlated with the level of cutaneous pigmentation and its ethnic background. This study provides a benchmark for further investigation on the damaging effects of UVR as risk for CM in Hispanics. View Full-Text
Keywords: cutaneous melanoma; Hispanics; melanocytes; ultraviolet radiation; DNA damage; cytogenetic damage; melanin pigmentation; skin; ethnicity cutaneous melanoma; Hispanics; melanocytes; ultraviolet radiation; DNA damage; cytogenetic damage; melanin pigmentation; skin; ethnicity
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Dasgupta, A.; Katdare, M. Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage in White, Hispanic and Black Skin Melanocytes: A Risk for Cutaneous Melanoma. Cancers 2015, 7, 1586-1604.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Cancers EISSN 2072-6694 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top