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Nutrients 2017, 9(12), 1358; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9121358

Amount, Distribution, and Quality of Protein Intake Are Not Associated with Muscle Mass, Strength, and Power in Healthy Older Adults without Functional Limitations—An enable Study

1
Institute for Biomedicine of Aging, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Kobergerstraße 60, 90408 Nürnberg, Germany
2
Chair of Nutritional Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Gregor-Mendel-Str., 85354 Freising—Weihenstephan, Germany
3
Institute of Nutritional Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Georg-Brauchle-Ring 62, 80992 Munich, Germany
4
Krankenhaus Barmherzige Brüder Regensburg, Prüfeninger Straße 86, 93049 Regensburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 November 2017 / Revised: 30 November 2017 / Accepted: 11 December 2017 / Published: 14 December 2017
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Abstract

To maintain muscle mass in older age, several aspects regarding the amount and distribution of protein intake have been suggested. Our objective was to investigate single and combined associations of daily protein intake, evenness of protein distribution across the three main meals, number of meals providing ≥0.4 g protein/kg body weight (BW), and number of meals providing ≥2.5 g leucine, with muscle mass, strength, and power in successful agers. In this cross-sectional study in 97 healthy community-dwelling adults without functional limitations aged 75–85 years, protein intake was assessed using 7-day food records. Muscle mass, leg muscle strength, leg muscle power, and handgrip strength were measured according to standardized protocols. Mean daily protein intake was 0.97 ± 0.28 g/kg BW and the coefficient of variance between main meals was 0.53 ± 0.19. Per day, 0.72 ± 0.50 meals providing ≥0.4 g protein/kg BW and 1.11 ± 0.76 meals providing ≥2.5 g leucine were consumed. No correlations between single or combined aspects of protein intake and skeletal muscle index, leg muscle power, leg muscle strength, or handgrip strength were observed (Spearman’s r of −0.280 to 0.291). In this sample of healthy older adults without functional limitations, aspects of protein intake were not associated with muscle mass, strength, or power. View Full-Text
Keywords: protein intake; protein distribution; aging; muscle strength; muscle power protein intake; protein distribution; aging; muscle strength; muscle power
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Gingrich, A.; Spiegel, A.; Kob, R.; Schoene, D.; Skurk, T.; Hauner, H.; Sieber, C.C.; Volkert, D.; Kiesswetter, E. Amount, Distribution, and Quality of Protein Intake Are Not Associated with Muscle Mass, Strength, and Power in Healthy Older Adults without Functional Limitations—An enable Study. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1358.

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