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Nutrients 2016, 8(9), 537; doi:10.3390/nu8090537

Rural-Urban Differences of Dietary Patterns, Overweight, and Bone Mineral Status in Chinese Students

1
Institute of Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191, China
2
Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563000, China
3
Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan 232001, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 July 2016 / Revised: 26 August 2016 / Accepted: 26 August 2016 / Published: 6 September 2016
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Abstract

China is an urban and rural social model country. In the past three decades, the developing speed of rural areas has been much slower than urban areas, which may lead to the differences in dietary patterns. This study aimed to investigate the disparities of dietary structures from urban and rural children, and to analyze the effects of different dietary patterns on their adverse outcome. Among 1590 students, aged 11 years to 17 years, from primary and middle schools, a cross-sectional study was conducted. There were three dietary patterns recognized: Westernization structure, meat diet structure, and Western and Chinese structure. Compared with rural students, more urban students were in the highest categories of the whole dietary patterns (p < 0.001). Overweight/obesity and central adiposity were more prevailing among urban students, while rural students had a more prevailing risk of bone fracture (p < 0.05). Through the adjustment for all confounding factors, the Westernization structure could increase the risk of overweight/obesity and central adiposity, the meat structure could increase the risk of elevated blood pressure/hypertension, while the risk of low bone mineral quality could be reduced by the Chinese and Western structure. In conclusion, a rural-urban disparity in dietary patterns was found in our study, and different dietary patterns were associated with the risk of some adverse outcomes. Therefore, there were different prevalences of the adverse outcomes between rural and urban students. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary pattern; overweight/obesity; central adiposity; risk of bone fracture; adolescent students; rural-urban disparity dietary pattern; overweight/obesity; central adiposity; risk of bone fracture; adolescent students; rural-urban disparity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Yang, Y.; Hu, X.-M.; Chen, T.-J.; Bai, M.-J. Rural-Urban Differences of Dietary Patterns, Overweight, and Bone Mineral Status in Chinese Students. Nutrients 2016, 8, 537.

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