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Nutrients 2016, 8(8), 487; doi:10.3390/nu8080487

Impact of Breakfast Skipping and Breakfast Choice on the Nutrient Intake and Body Mass Index of Australian Children

1
Nutrition Research Australia, Level 13 167 Macquarie Street, Sydney 2000, NSW, Australia
2
Nestlé Australia, 1 Homebush Bay Drive, Rhodes 2138, NSW, Australia
3
Cereal Partners Worldwide, Chemin du Viaduc 1, Prilly 1008, Vaud, Switzerland
4
Department of Statistics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109, NSW, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 June 2016 / Revised: 4 August 2016 / Accepted: 4 August 2016 / Published: 10 August 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [234 KB, uploaded 10 August 2016]

Abstract

Recent data on breakfast consumption among Australian children are limited. This study examined the impact of breakfast skipping and breakfast type (cereal or non-cereal) on nutrient intakes, likelihood of meeting nutrient targets and anthropometric measures. A secondary analysis of two 24-h recall data from the 2007 Australian National Children’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey was conducted (2–16 years; n = 4487) to identify (a) breakfast skippers and (b) breakfast consumers, with breakfast consumers further sub-divided into (i) non-cereal and (ii) cereal consumers. Only 4% skipped breakfast and 59% of skippers were 14–16 years. Breakfast consumers had significantly higher intakes of calcium and folate, and significantly lower intakes of total fat than breakfast skippers. Cereal consumers were more likely to meet targets and consume significantly higher fibre, calcium, iron, had significantly higher intakes of folate, total sugars and carbohydrate, and significantly lower intakes of total fat and sodium than non-cereal consumers. The prevalence of overweight was lower among breakfast consumers compared to skippers, and among cereal consumers compared to-cereal consumers (p < 0.001), while no significant differences were observed for mean body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score, waist circumference and physical activity level across the categories. Breakfast and particularly breakfast cereal consumption contributes important nutrients to children’s diets. View Full-Text
Keywords: breakfast; children; cereal; BMI; nutrient; fibre; folate; micronutrient; National Nutrition Survey; overweight breakfast; children; cereal; BMI; nutrient; fibre; folate; micronutrient; National Nutrition Survey; overweight
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Fayet-Moore, F.; Kim, J.; Sritharan, N.; Petocz, P. Impact of Breakfast Skipping and Breakfast Choice on the Nutrient Intake and Body Mass Index of Australian Children. Nutrients 2016, 8, 487.

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