Next Article in Journal
Cocoa Diet Prevents Antibody Synthesis and Modifies Lymph Node Composition and Functionality in a Rat Oral Sensitization Model
Next Article in Special Issue
Age-Dependent Changes in Resting Energy Expenditure (REE): Insights from Detailed Body Composition Analysis in Normal and Overweight Healthy Caucasians
Previous Article in Journal
Literature Review and Meta-Analysis on Micronutrient Fortified Condiments and Noodles: Reduction of Anemia in Children and Adults
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Evaluation of the Pea Pod System for Assessing Body Composition of Moderately Premature Infants
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2016, 8(4), 241; doi:10.3390/nu8040241

The Association between Sweet Taste Function, Anthropometry, and Dietary Intake in Adults

1
Centre for Advanced Sensory Science, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia
2
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 February 2016 / Revised: 3 April 2016 / Accepted: 18 April 2016 / Published: 23 April 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [239 KB, uploaded 23 April 2016]

Abstract

Variation in ability to detect, recognize, and perceive sweetness may influence food consumption, and eventually chronic nutrition-related conditions such as overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults. Participants’ (n = 60; mean age in years = 26, SD = ±7.8) sweet taste function for a range of sweeteners (glucose, fructose, sucrose, sucralose, erythritol, and Rebaudioside A) was assessed by measuring detection and recognition thresholds and sweetness intensity. Height, weight, and waist circumference were also measured, and participants also completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire. There was large inter-individual variation in detection, recognition and sweetness intensity measures. Pearson’s correlation coefficient revealed no robust correlations between measures of sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake, with the exception of suprathreshold intensity, which was moderately correlated with total energy intake (r = 0.23–0.40). One-way analysis of variance revealed no significant differences between the most and least sensitive participants in terms of BMI, waist circumference, and dietary intake for all measures of sweet taste function and sweeteners (all p > 0.01). When stratified into BMI categories, there were no significant differences in any measure of sweet taste function between the normal weight and overweight/obese participants (all p > 0.01). Results show that that sweet taste function is not associated with anthropometry and sweetness intensity measures are the most appropriate measure when assessing links between sweet taste and food consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: sweet taste function; sweet taste; dietary intake; high intensity sweeteners; sugar; BMI; sweet taste intensity sweet taste function; sweet taste; dietary intake; high intensity sweeteners; sugar; BMI; sweet taste intensity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Low, J.Y.Q.; Lacy, K.E.; McBride, R.; Keast, R.S.J. The Association between Sweet Taste Function, Anthropometry, and Dietary Intake in Adults. Nutrients 2016, 8, 241.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top