Next Article in Journal
A Specific Nutrient Combination Attenuates the Reduced Expression of PSD-95 in the Proximal Dendrites of Hippocampal Cell Body Layers in a Mouse Model of Phenylketonuria
Previous Article in Journal
Assessment of Nutrient Intakes: Introduction to the Special Issue
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2016, 8(4), 180; doi:10.3390/nu8040180

Gender Differences in Dietary Patterns and Their Association with the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Chinese: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Department of Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, 56 Xinjiannanlu Street, Taiyuan 030001, China
2
Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Datong Coal Mining Group, Datong 037000, China
3
Department of Urology, General Hospital of Datong Coal Mining Group, Datong 037000, China
4
Department of Health Statistics, Taiyuan Xinghualing District Food & Drug Administration, Taiyuan 030001, China
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 December 2015 / Revised: 16 March 2016 / Accepted: 17 March 2016 / Published: 25 March 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [264 KB, uploaded 25 March 2016]

Abstract

Few studies have investigated gender differences in dietary intake. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine gender differences in dietary patterns and their association with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. The food intakes of 3794 subjects enrolled by a two-stage cluster stratified sampling method were collected using a valid semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and its prevalence was 35.70% in the sample (37.67% in men and 24.67% in women). Dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis combined with cluster analysis and multiple group confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the factorial invariance between gender groups. The dominating dietary pattern for men was the “balanced” dietary pattern (32.65%) and that for women was the “high-salt and energy” dietary pattern (34.42%). For men, the “animal and fried food” dietary pattern was related to higher risk of MetS (odds ratio: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.01–1.60), after adjustment for age, marital status, socioeconomic status and lifestyle factors. For women, the “high-salt and energy” dietary pattern was related to higher risk of MetS (odds ratio: 2.27; 95% CI: 1.24–4.14). We observed gender differences in dietary patterns and their association with the prevalence of MetS. For men, the “animal and fried food” dietary pattern was associated with enhancive likelihood of MetS. For women, it was the “high-salt and energy” dietary pattern. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary patterns; metabolic syndrome; factor analysis; invariance; cluster analysis dietary patterns; metabolic syndrome; factor analysis; invariance; cluster analysis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, S.-H.; Qiao, N.; Huang, J.-J.; Sun, C.-M.; Cui, Y.; Tian, S.-S.; Wang, C.; Liu, X.-M.; Zhang, H.-X.; Wang, H.; Liang, J.; Lu, Q.; Wang, T. Gender Differences in Dietary Patterns and Their Association with the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Chinese: A Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients 2016, 8, 180.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top