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Nutrients 2016, 8(10), 604; doi:10.3390/nu8100604

Intakes of Folate and Vitamin B12 and Biomarkers of Status in the Very Old: The Newcastle 85+ Study

1
School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
2
Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4AX, UK
3
Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
4
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
5
Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 5PL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 August 2016 / Revised: 20 September 2016 / Accepted: 21 September 2016 / Published: 28 September 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue B-Vitamins and One-Carbon Metabolism)
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Abstract

Very old adults are at increased risk of folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies due to reduced food intake and gastrointestinal absorption. The main aim was to determine the association between folate and vitamin B12 intake from total diets and food groups, and status. Folate or vitamin B12 intakes (2 × 24 h multiple pass recalls) and red blood cell (RBC) folate or plasma vitamin B12 (chemiluminescence immunoassays) concentrations were available at baseline for 731 participants aged 85 from the Newcastle 85+ Study (North-East England). Generalized additive and binary logistic models estimated the associations between folate and vitamin B12 intakes from total diets and food groups, and RBC folate and plasma B12. Folate intake from total diets and cereal and cereal products was strongly associated with RBC folate (p < 0.001). Total vitamin B12 intake was weakly associated with plasma vitamin B12 (p = 0.054) but those with higher intakes from total diets or meat and meat products were less likely to have deficient status. Women homozygous for the FUT2 G allele had higher concentrations of plasma vitamin B12. Cereals and cereal products are a very important source of folate in the very old. Higher intakes of folate and vitamin B12 lower the risk of “inadequate” status. View Full-Text
Keywords: ‘aged 80 and over’; Newcastle 85+ Study; red blood cell folate; vitamin B12; FUT2; MTHFR; food groups ‘aged 80 and over’; Newcastle 85+ Study; red blood cell folate; vitamin B12; FUT2; MTHFR; food groups
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Mendonça, N.; Mathers, J.C.; Adamson, A.J.; Martin-Ruiz, C.; Seal, C.J.; Jagger, C.; Hill, T.R. Intakes of Folate and Vitamin B12 and Biomarkers of Status in the Very Old: The Newcastle 85+ Study. Nutrients 2016, 8, 604.

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