Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Maternal Nutrition and Glycaemic Index during Pregnancy Impacts on Offspring Adiposity at 6 Months of Age—Analysis from the ROLO Randomised Controlled Trial
Previous Article in Journal
Rise in DPA Following SDA-Rich Dietary Echium Oil Less Effective in Affording Anti-Arrhythmic Actions Compared to High DHA Levels Achieved with Fish Oil in Sprague-Dawley Rats
Previous Article in Special Issue
Advanced Glycation End Products: Link between Diet and Ovulatory Dysfunction in PCOS?
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessCommunication
Nutrients 2016, 8(1), 10; doi:10.3390/nu8010010

Altered Preconception Fatty Acid Intake Is Associated with Improved Pregnancy Rates in Overweight and Obese Women Undertaking in Vitro Fertilisation

1
The Robinson Research Institute, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5006, South Australia, Australia
2
CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, Adelaide 5000, South Australia, Australia
3
Fertility SA, Adelaide 5000, South Australia, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 November 2015 / Revised: 19 November 2015 / Accepted: 20 November 2015 / Published: 4 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Premenopausal Nutrition and Fertility)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [271 KB, uploaded 4 January 2016]   |  

Abstract

Maternal preconception diet is proposed to affect fertility. Prior research assessing the effect of altering the fatty acid profile on female fertility is conflicting. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of preconception maternal diet, specifically fatty acid profile, on pregnancies and live births following in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Forty-six overweight and obese women undergoing IVF were randomised to a diet and physical activity intervention (intervention) or standard care (control). Outcome measures included pregnancy, live birth and pre-study dietary intake from food frequency questionnaire. Twenty pregnancies (n = 12/18 vs. n = 8/20, p = 0.12) and 12 live births (n = 7/18 vs. n = 5/20, p = 0.48) occurred following the intervention with no differences between the treatment groups. On analysis adjusted for BMI and smoking status, women who became pregnant had higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake (p = 0.03), specifically omega-6 PUFA and linoleic acid (LA) (p = 0.045) with a trend for an elevated intake of omega-3 PUFA (p = 0.06). There were no dietary differences for women who did or did not have a live birth. Maternal preconception PUFA, and specifically omega-6 and LA intake, are associated with improved pregnancy rates in overweight and obese women undergoing IVF. This has implications for optimising fertility through preconception nutrition. View Full-Text
Keywords: in-vitro fertilization; weight loss; diet; exercise; pregnancy; fertility; assisted reproductive technology; unsaturated fat; omega 3 fatty acids in-vitro fertilization; weight loss; diet; exercise; pregnancy; fertility; assisted reproductive technology; unsaturated fat; omega 3 fatty acids
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Moran, L.J.; Tsagareli, V.; Noakes, M.; Norman, R. Altered Preconception Fatty Acid Intake Is Associated with Improved Pregnancy Rates in Overweight and Obese Women Undertaking in Vitro Fertilisation. Nutrients 2016, 8, 10.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top