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Nutrients 2015, 7(9), 7381-7398; doi:10.3390/nu7095343

Effect of 12 Weeks High Oleic Peanut Consumption on Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors and Body Composition

1
Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity, University of South Australia, G.P.O. Box 2471, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia
2
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, University of Newcastle (PRCH), University Drive Callaghan, New South Wales 2308, Australia
3
Department of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, G.P.O. Box 2471, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 July 2015 / Revised: 13 August 2015 / Accepted: 21 August 2015 / Published: 2 September 2015
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Abstract

Epidemiological evidence indicates an inverse association between nut consumption and obesity, inflammation, hyperlipidaemia and glucose intolerance. We investigated effects of high oleic peanut consumption vs. a nut free diet on adiposity and cardio-metabolic risk markers. In a randomised cross-over design, 61 healthy subjects (65 ± 7 years, body mass index (BMI) 31 ± 4 kg/m2) alternated either high oleic peanuts (15%–20% of energy) or a nut free diet for 12 weeks. Body composition and mass, waist circumference, C-reactive protein (CRP), lipids, glucose and insulin were assessed at baseline and after each phase. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) compared the two diets. Consistent with other nut studies, there were no differences in lipids, CRP, glucose and insulin with peanut consumption. In contrast, some reports have demonstrated benefits, likely due to differences in the study cohort. Energy intake was 10% higher (853 kJ, p < 0.05), following peanut consumption vs. control, attributed to a 30% increase in fat intake (p < 0.001), predominantly monounsaturated (increase 22 g, p < 0.05). Despite greater energy intake during the peanut phase, there were no differences in body composition, and less than predicted increase (0.5 kg) in body weight for this additional energy intake, possibly due to incomplete nutrient absorption and energy utilisation. View Full-Text
Keywords: high-oleic peanuts; inflammation; lipids; glucose; insulin; body weight high-oleic peanuts; inflammation; lipids; glucose; insulin; body weight
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Barbour, J.A.; Howe, P.R.C.; Buckley, J.D.; Bryan, J.; Coates, A.M. Effect of 12 Weeks High Oleic Peanut Consumption on Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors and Body Composition. Nutrients 2015, 7, 7381-7398.

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