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Nutrients 2015, 7(7), 5850-5867; doi:10.3390/nu7075254

Laboratory Determined Sugar Content and Composition of Commercial Infant Formulas, Baby Foods and Common Grocery Items Targeted to Children

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10025, USA
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 March 2015 / Revised: 2 July 2015 / Accepted: 6 July 2015 / Published: 16 July 2015
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Abstract

Excess added sugar consumption is tied to poor health outcomes in children. The sugar content of beverages and foods children are exposed to is mostly unknown, yet this information is imperative for understanding potential risks from overconsumption of sugars in early life. We determined actual sugar content by conducting a blinded laboratory analysis in infant formulas, breakfast cereals, packaged baked goods and yogurts. One hundred samples were sent to an independent laboratory for analysis via gas chromatography. Sugar content and composition was determined and total sugar was compared against nutrition labels. Of the 100 samples analyzed, 74% contained ≥20% of total calories per serving from added sugars. Nutrient label data underestimated or overestimated actual sugars and ~25% of all samples had actual total sugar values that were either <10% or >10% of labeled total sugar. Many products that are frequently marketed to and consumed by infants and young children contain sugars in amounts that differ from nutrition labels and often in excess of recommended daily levels. These findings provide further support for adding more comprehensive sugar labeling to food and beverage products, specifically those marketed to, or commonly consumed by, children. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar; formula; high fructose corn syrup; HFCS; obesity; fructose; breastfeeding sugar; formula; high fructose corn syrup; HFCS; obesity; fructose; breastfeeding
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Walker, R.W.; Goran, M.I. Laboratory Determined Sugar Content and Composition of Commercial Infant Formulas, Baby Foods and Common Grocery Items Targeted to Children. Nutrients 2015, 7, 5850-5867.

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