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Nutrients 2014, 6(8), 2987-2999; doi:10.3390/nu6082987

Association between Intake of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration among Premenopausal Women

1
Cancer Research Center, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Oncology Unit, CHU de Québec Research Center, Saint-Sacrement Hospital, Quebec, QC G1S 4L8, Canada
3
Deschênes-Fabia Center for Breast Diseases, Saint-Sacrement Hospital, Quebec, QC G1S 4L8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 May 2014 / Revised: 11 July 2014 / Accepted: 21 July 2014 / Published: 28 July 2014
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Abstract

Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages has increased in North America and seems to have several adverse health effects possibly through decreased circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between sugar-sweetened beverages intake and 25(OH)D concentrations among premenopausal women. Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages including colas, other carbonated beverages and sweet fruit drinks was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire among 741 premenopausal women. Plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D were quantified by radioimmunoassay. The association between sugar-sweetened beverages intake and 25(OH)D concentrations was evaluated using multivariate generalized linear models and Spearman correlations. A higher intake of colas was associated with lower mean 25(OH)D levels (67.0, 63.7, 64.7 and 58.5 nmol/L for never, <1, 1–3 and >3 servings/week, respectively; r = −0.11 (p = 0.004)). A correlation was observed between intake of other carbonated beverages and 25(OH)D concentrations but was not statistically significant (r = −0.06 (p = 0.10)). No association was observed between intake of sweet fruit drinks and 25(OH)D concentrations. This study suggests that high intake of colas may decrease 25(OH)D levels in premenopausal women. Considering the high consumption of these drinks in the general population and the possible consequences of vitamin D deficiency on health, this finding needs further investigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: 25-hydroxyvitamin D; vitamin D; carbonated beverages; fructose; premenopausal period; dietary sugars 25-hydroxyvitamin D; vitamin D; carbonated beverages; fructose; premenopausal period; dietary sugars
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Duchaine, C.S.; Diorio, C. Association between Intake of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration among Premenopausal Women. Nutrients 2014, 6, 2987-2999.

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