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Nutrients 2014, 6(7), 2572-2583; doi:10.3390/nu6072572

Vitamin C Supplementation Slightly Improves Physical Activity Levels and Reduces Cold Incidence in Men with Marginal Vitamin C Status: A Randomized Controlled Trial

1
School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, 500 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA
2
Isagenix® International LLC, 2225 S. Price Rd., Chandler, AZ 85286, USA
3
Cancer Treatment Centers of America®, 14200 W. Celebrate Life Way, Goodyear, AZ 85338, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 April 2014 / Revised: 12 May 2014 / Accepted: 1 July 2014 / Published: 9 July 2014
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [209 KB, uploaded 9 July 2014]

Abstract

The early indications of vitamin C deficiency are unremarkable (fatigue, malaise, depression) and may manifest as a reduced desire to be physically active; moreover, hypovitaminosis C may be associated with increased cold duration and severity. This study examined the impact of vitamin C on physical activity and respiratory tract infections during the peak of the cold season. Healthy non-smoking adult men (18–35 years; BMI < 34 kg/m2; plasma vitamin C < 45 µmol/L) received either 1000 mg of vitamin C daily (n = 15) or placebo (n = 13) in a randomized, double-blind, eight-week trial. All participants completed the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 daily and the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire weekly. In the final two weeks of the trial, the physical activity score rose modestly for the vitamin C group vs. placebo after adjusting for baseline values: +39.6% (95% CI [−4.5,83.7]; p = 0.10). The number of participants reporting cold episodes was 7 and 11 for the vitamin C and placebo groups respectively during the eight-week trial (RR = 0.55; 95% CI [0.33,0.94]; p = 0.04) and cold duration was reduced 59% in the vitamin C versus placebo groups (−3.2 days; 95% CI [−7.0,0.6]; p = 0.06). These data suggest measurable health advantages associated with vitamin C supplementation in a population with adequate-to-low vitamin C status. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin C; physical activity; cold symptoms vitamin C; physical activity; cold symptoms
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Johnston, C.S.; Barkyoumb, G.M.; Schumacher, S.S. Vitamin C Supplementation Slightly Improves Physical Activity Levels and Reduces Cold Incidence in Men with Marginal Vitamin C Status: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2014, 6, 2572-2583.

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