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Nutrients 2014, 6(12), 5500-5516; doi:10.3390/nu6125500

Bee Pollen Improves Muscle Protein and Energy Metabolism in Malnourished Old Rats through Interfering with the Mtor Signaling Pathway and Mitochondrial Activity

1
INRA, UMR1019, Unité de Nutrition Humaine, CRNH Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000, France
2
Clermont Université, Université d'Auvergne, Unité de Nutrition Humaine, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000, France
3
Pollenergie, La Grabère, St Hilaire de Lusignan F-47450, France
4
CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clinical Nutrition Department, Clermont-Ferrand F-63003, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 September 2014 / Revised: 15 October 2014 / Accepted: 4 November 2014 / Published: 1 December 2014
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Abstract

Although the management of malnutrition is a priority in older people, this population shows a resistance to refeeding. Fresh bee pollen contains nutritional substances of interest for malnourished people. The aim was to evaluate the effect of fresh bee pollen supplementation on refeeding efficiency in old malnourished rats. Male 22-month-old Wistar rats were undernourished by reducing food intake for 12 weeks. The animals were then renourished for three weeks with the same diet supplemented with 0%, 5% or 10% of fresh monofloral bee pollen. Due to changes in both lean mass and fat mass, body weight decreased during malnutrition and increased after refeeding with no between-group differences (p < 0.0001). Rats refed with the fresh bee pollen-enriched diets showed a significant increase in muscle mass compared to restricted rats (p < 0.05). The malnutrition period reduced the muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR/p70S6kinase/4eBP1 activation, and only the 10%-pollen diet was able to restore these parameters. Mitochondrial activity was depressed with food restriction and was only improved by refeeding with the fresh bee pollen-containing diets. In conclusion, refeeding diets that contain fresh monofloral bee pollen improve muscle mass and metabolism in old, undernourished rats. View Full-Text
Keywords: fresh bee pollen; body composition; skeletal muscle; protein synthesis; mitochondria fresh bee pollen; body composition; skeletal muscle; protein synthesis; mitochondria
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Salles, J.; Cardinault, N.; Patrac, V.; Berry, A.; Giraudet, C.; Collin, M.-L.; Chanet, A.; Tagliaferri, C.; Denis, P.; Pouyet, C.; Boirie, Y.; Walrand, S. Bee Pollen Improves Muscle Protein and Energy Metabolism in Malnourished Old Rats through Interfering with the Mtor Signaling Pathway and Mitochondrial Activity. Nutrients 2014, 6, 5500-5516.

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