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Nutrients 2013, 5(12), 5114-5126; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu5125114

Diurnal Triglyceridemia in Relation to Alcohol Intake in Men

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Diabetes and Vascular Medicine, St Franciscus Gasthuis, P.O. Box 10900, Rotterdam 3004 BA, The Netherlands
2
IiSGM (Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria), HGU Gregorio Marañón (Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón), Madrid 28007, Spain
3
Department of Statistics and Education, St Franciscus Gasthuis, P.O. Box 10900, Rotterdam 3004 BA, The Netherlands
4
Institute of Health Care Policy and Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam 3004 BA, The Netherlands
5
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28007, Spain
6
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28007, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 September 2013 / Revised: 19 November 2013 / Accepted: 3 December 2013 / Published: 16 December 2013
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Abstract

Fasting and postprandial triglyceride concentrations largely depend on dietary and lifestyle factors. Alcohol intake is associated with triglycerides, but the effect of alcohol on diurnal triglyceridemia in a free living situation is unknown. During three days, 139 men (range: 18–80 years) measured their own capillary triglyceride (cTG) concentrations daily on six fixed time-points before and after meals, and the total daily alcohol intake was recorded. The impact of daily alcohol intake (none; low, <10 g/day; moderate, 10–30 g/day; high, >30 g/day) on diurnal triglyceridemia was analyzed by the incremental area under the cTG curve (∆cTG-AUC) reflecting the mean of the six different time-points. Fasting cTG were similar between the alcohol groups, but a trend of increased cTG was observed in men with moderate and high alcohol intake after dinner and at bedtime (p for trend <0.001) which persisted after adjustment for age, smoking and body mass index. The ∆cTG-AUC was significantly lower in males with low alcohol intake (3.0 ± 1.9 mmol·h/L) (n = 27) compared to males with no (7.0 ± 1.8 mmol·h/L) (n = 34), moderate (6.5 ± 1.8 mmol·h/L) (n = 54) or high alcohol intake (7.2 ± 2.2 mmol·h/L) (n = 24), when adjusted for age, smoking and body mass index (adjusted p value < 0.05). In males, low alcohol intake was associated with decreased diurnal triglyceridemia, whereas moderate and high alcohol intake was associated with increased triglycerides after dinner and at bed time. View Full-Text
Keywords: ethanol; lipemia; postprandial; triglyceride ethanol; lipemia; postprandial; triglyceride
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Torres do Rego, A.; Klop, B.; Birnie, E.; Elte, J.W.F.; Ramos, V.C.; Walther, L.A.-S.; Cabezas, M.C. Diurnal Triglyceridemia in Relation to Alcohol Intake in Men. Nutrients 2013, 5, 5114-5126.

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