Next Article in Journal
Criteria Comparison for Classifying Peatland Vegetation Types Using In Situ Hyperspectral Measurements
Previous Article in Journal
Characterizing Regional-Scale Combustion Using Satellite Retrievals of CO, NO2 and CO2
Article Menu
Issue 7 (July) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Remote Sens. 2017, 9(7), 747; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs9070747

Expansion of Industrial Plantations Continues to Threaten Malayan Tiger Habitat

1
Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
2
World Resources Institute, 10 G Street NE Suite 800, Washington, DC 20002, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 May 2017 / Revised: 4 July 2017 / Accepted: 5 July 2017 / Published: 19 July 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3357 KB, uploaded 20 July 2017]   |  

Abstract

Southeast Asia has some of the highest deforestation rates globally, with Malaysia being identified as a deforestation hotspot. The Malayan tiger, a critically endangered subspecies of the tiger endemic to Peninsular Malaysia, is threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation. In this study, we estimate the natural forest loss and conversion to plantations in Peninsular Malaysia and specifically in its tiger habitat between 1988 and 2012 using the Landsat data archive. We estimate a total loss of 1.35 Mha of natural forest area within Peninsular Malaysia over the entire study period, with 0.83 Mha lost within the tiger habitat. Nearly half (48%) of the natural forest loss area represents conversion to tree plantations. The annual area of new plantation establishment from natural forest conversion increased from 20 thousand ha year−1 during 1988–2000 to 34 thousand ha year−1 during 2001–2012. Large-scale industrial plantations, primarily those of oil palm, as well as recently cleared land, constitute 80% of forest converted to plantations since 1988. We conclude that industrial plantation expansion has been a persistent threat to natural forests within the Malayan tiger habitat. Expanding oil palm plantations dominate forest conversions while those for rubber are an emerging threat. View Full-Text
Keywords: Peninsular Malaysia; tiger habitat; forest loss; plantations; oil palm; rubber Peninsular Malaysia; tiger habitat; forest loss; plantations; oil palm; rubber
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Shevade, V.S.; Potapov, P.V.; Harris, N.L.; Loboda, T.V. Expansion of Industrial Plantations Continues to Threaten Malayan Tiger Habitat. Remote Sens. 2017, 9, 747.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Remote Sens. EISSN 2072-4292 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top