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Remote Sens. 2016, 8(12), 999; doi:10.3390/rs8120999

Stage Monitoring in Turbid Reservoirs with an Inclined Terrestrial Near-Infrared Lidar

1
Instituto Mexicano de Tecnología del Agua (IMTA), Paseo Cuauhnáhuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, Jiutepec Mor. 62550, Mexico
2
DISIME S.A. de C.V., Playa Villa del Mar No. 180, Col. Militar Marte, Ciudad de México D.F. 08830, Mexico
3
Ecole des Mines de Douai (EMD), 941 rue Charles Bourseul, Douai 59508, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Deepak R. Mishra and Prasad S. Thenkabail
Received: 26 September 2016 / Revised: 11 November 2016 / Accepted: 23 November 2016 / Published: 6 December 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [8343 KB, uploaded 6 December 2016]   |  

Abstract

To monitor the stage in turbid reservoirs with a sloping bank, it has been proposed to install a near-infrared Lidar on the bank and to orient it so that it points at the water surface with a large incidence angle (between ≈ 30° and 70°). The technique assumes that the Lidar can detect suspended particles that are slightly below the water surface. Some laboratory results and the first long-term assessment (>2 years) of the technique are presented. It found that: (1) although the test Lidar provides erratic distance data, they can be easily filtered according to the intensity of the received signal; (2) the Lidar provides reliable data only when the water is very turbid (Secchi depth smaller than ≈ 1.0 m); and (3) the reliable data can be used to estimate daily stage values (after a simple field calibration) with an uncertainty better than ±0.08 m (p = 0.95). Although the present form of the technique is not very accurate, it uses an inexpensive instrument (≈1500 USD) which can be easily installed in a safe place (such as is the roof of a building). It is argued that the technique could be also used to monitor the stage and the sub-surface velocity in others turbid water bodies, such as some coastal areas (a recent field of application) and flooding rivers. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydrometry; water level; emerging technique; terrestrial Lidar; laser rangefinder; light backscattering; Tyndall effect hydrometry; water level; emerging technique; terrestrial Lidar; laser rangefinder; light backscattering; Tyndall effect
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Tamari, S.; Guerrero-Meza, V.; Rifad, Y.; Bravo-Inclán, L.; Sánchez-Chávez, J.J. Stage Monitoring in Turbid Reservoirs with an Inclined Terrestrial Near-Infrared Lidar. Remote Sens. 2016, 8, 999.

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