Remote Sens. 2012, 4(4), 810-829; doi:10.3390/rs4040810
Article

Improved Forest Biomass and Carbon Estimations Using Texture Measures from WorldView-2 Satellite Data

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Received: 1 February 2012; in revised form: 15 March 2012 / Accepted: 15 March 2012 / Published: 26 March 2012
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Accurate estimation of aboveground biomass and carbon stock has gained importance in the context of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol. In order to develop improved forest stratum–specific aboveground biomass and carbon estimation models for humid rainforest in northeast Madagascar, this study analyzed texture measures derived from WorldView-2 satellite data. A forest inventory was conducted to develop stratum-specific allometric equations for dry biomass. On this basis, carbon was calculated by applying a conversion factor. After satellite data preprocessing, vegetation indices, principal components, and texture measures were calculated. The strength of their relationships with the stratum-specific plot data was analyzed using Pearson’s correlation. Biomass and carbon estimation models were developed by performing stepwise multiple linear regression. Pearson’s correlation coefficients revealed that (a) texture measures correlated more with biomass and carbon than spectral parameters, and (b) correlations were stronger for degraded forest than for non-degraded forest. For degraded forest, the texture measures of Correlation, Angular Second Moment, and Contrast, derived from the red band, contributed to the best estimation model, which explained 84% of the variability in the field data (relative RMSE = 6.8%). For non-degraded forest, the vegetation index EVI and the texture measures of Variance, Mean, and Correlation, derived from the newly introduced coastal blue band, both NIR bands, and the red band, contributed to the best model, which explained 81% of the variability in the field data (relative RMSE = 11.8%). These results indicate that estimation of tropical rainforest biomass/carbon, based on very high resolution satellite data, can be improved by (a) developing and applying forest stratum–specific models, and (b) including textural information in addition to spectral information.
Keywords: aboveground biomass; forest carbon; tropical rainforest; REDD; Madagascar; WorldView-2; correlation; regression analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Eckert, S. Improved Forest Biomass and Carbon Estimations Using Texture Measures from WorldView-2 Satellite Data. Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 810-829.

AMA Style

Eckert S. Improved Forest Biomass and Carbon Estimations Using Texture Measures from WorldView-2 Satellite Data. Remote Sensing. 2012; 4(4):810-829.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Eckert, Sandra. 2012. "Improved Forest Biomass and Carbon Estimations Using Texture Measures from WorldView-2 Satellite Data." Remote Sens. 4, no. 4: 810-829.

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