Next Article in Journal
Farmland Rental and Productivity of Wheat and Maize: An Empirical Study in Gansu, China
Previous Article in Journal
Capturing Tourists’ Preferences for the Management of Community-Based Ecotourism in a Forest Park
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1674; doi:10.3390/su9091674

LEED, Its Efficacy and Fallacy in a Regional Context—An Urban Heat Island Case in California

1
Railroad System Research Center, Korea Railroad Research Institute, 360-1 Woram-dong, Uiwang-si, Gyeonggi-do 437-757, Korea
2
Division of Architecture and Urban Design, College of Urban Sciences, Incheon National University, 119 Academy-Ro, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-Gu Incheon 22012, Korea
3
Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, College of Architecture, Texas A & M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA
4
Department of Architecture, College of Architecture, Texas A & M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 September 2017 / Revised: 18 September 2017 / Accepted: 18 September 2017 / Published: 20 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Engineering and Science)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1100 KB, uploaded 20 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

The use of energy in the building sector has increased rapidly over the past two decades. Accordingly, various building assessment methods have developed in green building practices. However, the questions still remain in regard to how positively green buildings affect regional surroundings. This study investigates the possible relationship between LEED-certified buildings and urban heat island effect. Using GIS with spatial regression, the study found that constructing an LEED building in a 30-m boundary could possibly lower the temperature of the surrounding environment by 0.35 °C. Also, having a higher certification level, such as Gold or Platinum, increased the lowering effect by 0.48 °C, while a lower certification level, such as Certified or Silver, had a lowering effect of 0.26 °C. Although LEED has gained a substantial amount of interest and skepticism at the same time, the study results could be a potential sign that the Sustainable Sites Credits or energy-efficient materials play a positive role in lowering the temperature. View Full-Text
Keywords: LEED; urban heat island effect; regional credits; OLS regression analysis; spatial analysis; land cover; sustainable architecture LEED; urban heat island effect; regional credits; OLS regression analysis; spatial analysis; land cover; sustainable architecture
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Shin, M.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Gu, D.; Kim, H. LEED, Its Efficacy and Fallacy in a Regional Context—An Urban Heat Island Case in California. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1674.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top