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Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1525; doi:10.3390/su9091525

Some Results on the Vulnerability Assessment of HAWTs Subjected to Wind and Seismic Actions

1
Department of Civil Engineering, Design, Building and Environment, DICDEA, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Aversa 81031, Italy
2
College of Civil Engineering, Nanjing Technology University, Nanjing 211816, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 July 2017 / Revised: 14 August 2017 / Accepted: 22 August 2017 / Published: 27 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Energy Sustainability)
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Abstract

The spread of the wind energy industry has caused the construction of wind farms in areas prone to high seismic activity. Accordingly, the analysis of wind turbine loading associated with earthquakes is of crucial importance for an accurate assessment of their structural safety. Within this topic, this paper presents some preliminary results of a probabilistic framework intended to be used for the estimation of the probability of failure of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine-supporting structures when subjected to the wind and seismic actions. In particular, the multi-hazard fragility curves of the wind turbine-supporting structure were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. A decoupling approach consisting of aerodynamic analysis of the rigid rotor blade model and subsequent linear dynamic Finite Element analyses of the supporting structure, including aerodynamic damping, was used. The failure condition of the tower structure was estimated according to the stress design procedure proposed by EC3 for the buckling limit state assessment. Finally, the vulnerability assessment of HAWTs to wind and seismic actions was evaluated in terms of fragility curves describing the probability of failure of the supporting tower structure as a function of the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) for each parked and operational wind condition. In particular, the results highlight a probability of failure larger than 50% for high levels of seismic action (PGA greater than 0.7 g) combined with the rotor in parked condition (wind speed of 3 m/s) or in operational rated condition (wind speed of 11.4 m/s). View Full-Text
Keywords: land-based wind turbine; wind action; seismic action; uncoupled analysis; aerodynamic damping; seismic response; fragility land-based wind turbine; wind action; seismic action; uncoupled analysis; aerodynamic damping; seismic response; fragility
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Avossa, A.M.; Demartino, C.; Contestabile, P.; Ricciardelli, F.; Vicinanza, D. Some Results on the Vulnerability Assessment of HAWTs Subjected to Wind and Seismic Actions. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1525.

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