Next Article in Journal
The Effect of Carbon Tax in Aviation Industry on the Multilateral Simulation Game
Previous Article in Journal
The UK’s Emissions and Employment Footprints: Exploring the Trade-Offs
Previous Article in Special Issue
Establishment of the Sustainable Ecosystem for the Regional Shipping Industry Based on System Dynamics
Article Menu
Issue 7 (July) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2017, 9(7), 1243; doi:10.3390/su9071243

Evaluating the Scale Effect of Soil Erosion Using Landscape Pattern Metrics and Information Entropy: A Case Study in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Area, China

1
Department of Regional Planning and Management, School of Resource and Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070, China
2
Department of Geography and Geology and Institute for Geospatial Research and Education, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI 48197, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 May 2017 / Revised: 12 July 2017 / Accepted: 13 July 2017 / Published: 16 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Ecosystems and Society in the Context of Big and New Data)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3739 KB, uploaded 16 July 2017]   |  

Abstract

The regular patterns of soil erosion tend to change at different scales of observation, affecting the mechanism of soil erosion and its evolution characteristics. This phenomenon has essential scientific significance for the rational allocation of land resources and for studies on sustainable ecosystems. As an important agricultural area in China, Danjiangkou reservoir is threatened by severe soil erosion. In this study, we selected four kinds of landscape pattern metrics, including patch density, fractal dimension, Shannon diversity index, and connectivity, to analyze soil erosion intensity in the Danjiangkou reservoir area at different scales based on landscape ecological principles. In addition, we determine the optimum research scale of the experimental area by calculating the information entropy value of soil patches at different scales. The findings suggest that: (1) the landscape pattern of soil erosion in the experimental area is obviously scale-dependent, and the responses to scale differ from index to index; (2) as the scale of observation increases, the fragmentation of soil patches is weakened, the stability of different landscape components is enhanced, and the soil becomes less vulnerable to erosion; and (3) based on information entropy theory, 60 m is confirmed to be the optimum scale of this study. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil erosion; scale effect; landscape pattern metrics; information entropy; sustainable ecosystem; Danjiangkou reservoir area soil erosion; scale effect; landscape pattern metrics; information entropy; sustainable ecosystem; Danjiangkou reservoir area
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, Q.; Huang, J.; Yang, X.; Ren, L.; Tang, C.; Zhao, L. Evaluating the Scale Effect of Soil Erosion Using Landscape Pattern Metrics and Information Entropy: A Case Study in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Area, China. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1243.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top