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Sustainability 2017, 9(4), 595; doi:10.3390/su9040595

Redistributing Phosphorus in Animal Manure from a Livestock-Intensive Region to an Arable Region: Exploration of Environmental Consequences

1
Division of Environment and Natural Resources, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, 1430 Ås, Norway
2
Industrial Ecology Programme, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Sem Sælands vei 7, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
3
Ostfold Research, Stadion 4, 1671 Kråkerøy, Norway
4
Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management (INA), Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), 1432 Ås, Norway
5
Van Hall Larenstein, University of Applied Sciences, Agora 1, 8934 CJ Leeuwarden, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Federica De Leo
Received: 5 March 2017 / Revised: 6 April 2017 / Accepted: 8 April 2017 / Published: 12 April 2017
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Abstract

Specialized agricultural production between regions has led to large regional differences in soil phosphorus (P) over time. Redistribution of surplus manure P from high livestock density regions to regions with arable farming can improve agricultural P use efficiency. In this paper, the central research question was whether more efficient P use through manure P redistribution comes at a price of increased environmental impacts when compared to a reference system. Secondly, we wanted to explore the influence on impacts of regions with different characteristics. For this purpose, a life cycle assessment was performed and two regions in Norway were used as a case study. Several technology options for redistribution were examined in a set of scenarios, including solid–liquid separation, with and without anaerobic digestion of manure before separation. The most promising scenario in terms of environmental impacts was anaerobic digestion with subsequent decanter centrifuge separation of the digestate. This scenario showed that redistribution can be done with net environmental impacts being similar to or lower than the reference situation, including transport. The findings emphasize the need to use explicit regional characteristics of the donor and recipient regions to study the impacts of geographical redistribution of surplus P in organic fertilizer residues. View Full-Text
Keywords: life cycle assessment (LCA); manure management; phosphorus; nutrient recycling; nutrient redistribution life cycle assessment (LCA); manure management; phosphorus; nutrient recycling; nutrient redistribution
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Hanserud, O.S.; Lyng, K.-A.; Vries, J.W.D.; Øgaard, A.F.; Brattebø, H. Redistributing Phosphorus in Animal Manure from a Livestock-Intensive Region to an Arable Region: Exploration of Environmental Consequences. Sustainability 2017, 9, 595.

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