Next Article in Journal
The Retail Chain Design for Perishable Food: The Case of Price Strategy and Shelf Space Allocation
Next Article in Special Issue
Modes of Governing and Policy of Local and Regional Governments Supporting Local Low-Carbon Energy Initiatives; Exploring the Cases of the Dutch Regions of Overijssel and Fryslân
Previous Article in Journal
Using Goal-Programming to Model the Effect of Stakeholder Determined Policy and Industry Changes on the Future Management of and Ecosystem Services Provision by Ireland’s Western Peatland Forests
Previous Article in Special Issue
Towards the Comprehensive Design of Energy Infrastructures
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2017, 9(1), 16; doi:10.3390/su9010016

Cheat Electricity? The Political Economy of Green Electricity Delivery on the Dutch Market for Households and Small Business

QA+ Research and Consultancy, Boddens Hosangweg 83, 2481KX Woubrugge, The Netherlands
Academic Editors: Michiel Heldeweg, Ellen van Bueren, Anna Butenko, Thomas Hoppe, Séverine Saintier and Victoria Daskalova
Received: 14 October 2016 / Revised: 5 December 2016 / Accepted: 19 December 2016 / Published: 23 December 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1222 KB, uploaded 23 December 2016]   |  

Abstract

The European Commission’s renewable energy directive introduced a market-based Guarantees of Origin (GO)-trade system that gives consumers the choice of buying “real” green energy. This has been successful, as the market share of Dutch households that buy green energy grew to 64% in 2015. However, societal organizations are dissatisfied with the green energy offered, categorizing it as “cheat” electricity. This article aims to solve this riddle of a successful product created under the GO-trade system but also heavily criticized. Research reveals a lively marketplace with buyers eager to buy green energy and energy producers offering a wide range of labels. Marketplace mechanisms are strongly influenced by political choices, and financial support for energy suppliers makes green energy a credible option. Societal groups, however, argue that the information provided is incomplete and misleading, that buying green energy does not impact positively on greenhouse gas reduction, and that better information and structural reform are required. The GO-trade system is strongly influenced by member states’ national energy politics. Societal organizations have helped to optimize the implementation of the GO-trade system in the Netherlands, but they are not expected to be able to support the creation of a level playing field in which an optimal GO-trade system will flourish. View Full-Text
Keywords: renewable energy directive; directive 2009/28; green electricity; cheat electricity; Guarantees of Origin; market-based system renewable energy directive; directive 2009/28; green electricity; cheat electricity; Guarantees of Origin; market-based system
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Hufen, J.A.M. Cheat Electricity? The Political Economy of Green Electricity Delivery on the Dutch Market for Households and Small Business. Sustainability 2017, 9, 16.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top