Next Article in Journal
Can We Improve Indicator Design for Complex Sustainable Development Goals? A Comparison of a Values-Based and Conventional Approach
Previous Article in Journal
A Grey Forecasting Approach for the Sustainability Performance of Logistics Companies
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2016, 8(9), 859; doi:10.3390/su8090859

The Use of Oral Histories to Identify Criteria for Future Scenarios of Sustainable Farming in the South Yangtze River, China

1
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 20433, China
2
Values and Sustainability Group, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Brighton BN2 4GJ, UK
3
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan Tyndall Centre, Fudan University, Shanghai 20433, China
1
Fudan University, Shanghai, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Iain Gordon and Manuel González de Molina
Received: 15 April 2016 / Revised: 22 August 2016 / Accepted: 23 August 2016 / Published: 29 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1028 KB, uploaded 29 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

Agricultural practices in Jiangnan water towns have historically been identified as maintaining a balance between human activity and the local environment, but are now a significant local source of water pollution. Using a multi-methods approach, this study deduces the environmental impact of traditional practices, and the socially desired conditions for successfully reintroducing critical ones. Oral histories from 31 farmers in Tianshanzhuang village, South Yangtze River were in order to chart changes in farming practices over four historic periods, and used to estimate the nitrogen and phosphorus burdens per acre. Findings show that the use of Lan River Mud—dredged mud for fertilizer—was key in producing a positive impact, but abandoned after the 1980s. Four criteria hindering reintroduction of traditional practices were identified, and potentially useful but fragmented emerging local candidate practices are considered against these, as are recent practices in Japan. We propose that the cooperation of several stakeholders with various related government departments in China could lead to a portfolio of effective policy changes and should be studied further: to include new methods and uses of Lan River Mud; the integration of aquaculture, leisure and tourism industries with agriculture; and the production of organic produce with well-planned internet-linked sales, delivery and coordination mechanisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: farming practices; oral history; sustainable farming; environmental impact; environmental impact assessment farming practices; oral history; sustainable farming; environmental impact; environmental impact assessment
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, P.; Moreno, J.M.; Song, P.; Hoover, E.; Harder, M.K. The Use of Oral Histories to Identify Criteria for Future Scenarios of Sustainable Farming in the South Yangtze River, China. Sustainability 2016, 8, 859.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top