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Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3194; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093194

Sustainability and Shared Mobility Models

School of Geography and Planning, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3WA, UK
Received: 27 July 2018 / Revised: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 23 August 2018 / Published: 7 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Transport: Transport, Environment, and Development)
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Abstract

Shared mobility or mobility in the sharing economy is characterised by the sharing of a vehicle instead of ownership, and the use of technology to connect users and providers. Based on a literature review, the following four emerging models are identified: (1) peer to peer provision with a company as a broker, providing a platform where individuals can rent their cars when not in use; (2) short term rental of vehicles managed and owned by a provider; (3) companies that own no cars themselves but sign up ordinary car owners as drivers; and (4) on demand private cars, vans, or buses, and other vehicles, such as big taxis, shared by passengers going in the same direction. The first three models can yield profits to private parties, but they do not seem to have potential to reduce congestion and CO2 emissions substantially. The fourth model, which entails individuals not only sharing a vehicle, but actually travelling together at the same time, is promising in terms of congestion and CO2 emissions reductions. It is also the least attractive to individuals, given the disbenefits in terms of waiting time, travel time, comfort, and convenience, in comparison with the private car. Potential incentives to encourage shared mobility are also discussed, and research needs are outlined. View Full-Text
Keywords: shared mobility; mobility as a service; sharing economy; Uber; traffic congestion; CO2 emissions; sustainable transport; sustainable mobility; sharing economy; taxi industry; collaborative consumption shared mobility; mobility as a service; sharing economy; Uber; traffic congestion; CO2 emissions; sustainable transport; sustainable mobility; sharing economy; taxi industry; collaborative consumption
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Santos, G. Sustainability and Shared Mobility Models. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3194.

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