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Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3154; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093154

Design Methodology for Street-Oriented Block Housing Considering Daylight and Natural Ventilation

Department of Architecture, Dankook University, Yongin 16890, Korea
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Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 30 August 2018 / Accepted: 31 August 2018 / Published: 4 September 2018
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Abstract

This study presents a design methodology for street-oriented block housing, as a model for gradual small-scale block-unit development, that can secure two hours of continuous access to daylight on the winter solstice at azimuth angles of 0° and 60° in Seoul, South Korea, and, in addition, developed a methodology for wind path planning for existing types of developed housing. The results of this study have confirmed the feasibility of a housing design that can secure two hours of continuous access to daylight along with no less than 200 percent of development density, achieved through the elimination of self-shadows by using distances between residential buildings and shadow characteristics according to azimuth angles. In addition, the study identified an air flow stagnation section by assessing the air flow of the exterior space of street-oriented block housing in consideration of day-lit environments, and examined a planning model that can enhance natural ventilation potential by activating the air flow of the exterior space. Wind path planning was conducted for 24 alternatives that were produced based on the developed design methodology, and the wind velocity ratio of street-oriented block housing ranged from 0.34 to 0.59. In terms of disadvantages of street-oriented block housing in securing wind paths, this study confirmed that air flow could be strengthened by adjusting the form of the lower-part opening, which is open in the direction of incoming wind, designing a staggered mass layout in high-rise masses, and combining building floor heights. The above findings of this study suggest that a performance-based approach is necessary for the improvement of environmental performance in street-oriented block housing, in consideration of azimuth angles and the prevailing wind direction from the initial phase of planning. View Full-Text
Keywords: street-oriented block housing; daylighting; right to light; natural ventilation; wind path planning street-oriented block housing; daylighting; right to light; natural ventilation; wind path planning
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Kim, H.-J.; Kim, J.-S. Design Methodology for Street-Oriented Block Housing Considering Daylight and Natural Ventilation. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3154.

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